Samuel Marcus Nursing Home

Samuel Marcus Nursing Home

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Samuel Marcus Nursing Home? Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.

Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Samuel Marcus Nursing Home

Samuel Marcus Nursing HomeSamuel Marcus is a for profit, 22-bed Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents of Weymouth, Braintree, Quincy,  Hingham, Holbrook, and the other towns in and surrounding the Greater Boston area.

Samuel Marcus focuses on 24 hour care, respite care, hospice care and rehabilitation services.

Samuel Marcus Nursing Home
28 Front Street
Weymouth, MA 02188

Phone: (781) 337-0772
Website: http://ec-sm.com/

CMS Star Quality Rating

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas.  As of 2017, Samuel Marcus Nursing Home in Weymouth Massachusetts received a rating of 1 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 1 out of 5 ( Much Below Average)
State Health Inspections 1 out of 5 ( Much Below Average)
Staffing 3 out of 5 (Average)
Quality Measures 2 out of 5 (Below Average)

Fines and Penalties

Our Nursing Home Injury Lawyers inspected government records and discovered Samuel Marcus committed the following offenses:

Failed to provide activities to meet the interests and needs of each resident.

Based on observation, staff interview and record review, the Facility failed to identify and provide an ongoing program of activities for each resident’s interests and needs to enhance each resident’s highest practicable level of physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being.

Findings include:

1. Observation during all 3 days of survey (2/28/17, 3/1/17 and 3/2/17), revealed that there was one Activity Staff member who worked 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M.

2. Interview with the Active Staff Member on 2/28/17 at 11:40 A.M. indicated that she joined the facility 2/21/17. The Activity staff member indicated she works Tuesday to Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. (24 hours per week ).

3. Interview with the DNS (director of nursing services) on 2/28/17 at 12:30 P.M. indicated that the prior Activity Staff Member had left the facility in mid-January 2017.

4. At the group interview on 2/28/17 at 1:30 P.M., five of six residents in attendance said that activities at the facility were lacking especially in the evenings and on weekends. The group said that although movies are on the activity calendar, they are not shown especially on the weekends.

5. Review of the Activities Calendars for February 2017 and March 2017 indicated that there were no activities scheduled after 3:00 P.M. except for a Super Bowl Pizza Party held on 2/5/17 at 4:00 P.M.

The Saturday calendar for February listed the following activities each week: 9:30 A.M. – 10:00 A.M. Stretch; 10:00 A.M. – Noon Music on 2/4/17 and Crosswords on 2/11, 2/18, 2/25/17; 1:00 P.M. – 3:00 P.M. movies on 2/4, oldies music on 2/11; superbowl replay on 2/18 and trivia on 2/25/17.

The Saturday calendar for March listed the same activities each week: 10:00 – Noon Stretch; 10:00 A.M. – Noon relax with classical music; 1:00 – 3:00 PM Social (described on the calendars as: Social time with family & friends).

The Sunday calendar for February listed the following activities: 9:30 A.M. – 10:00 A.M. Stretch. bowling 10:00 A.M. – 12 Noon on 2/12; Puzzles on 2/19; Resident Meeting 10 – Noon on 2/26; Matinee 1 – 3 on 2/12, 2/19 and 2/26.

The Sunday calendar for March listed the same activities each week: 9:30 A.M. -10:00 A.M. Stretch; 10:00 A.M. – 12 Noon Oldies Music except for a resident meeting on 2/26/17; 1:00 P.M. -3:00 P.M. Sunday Matinee.

6. On 3/2/17 at 2:30 P.M. during an interview with the Activity Staff Member, Surveyor #1 asked who provides the activities on the weekend as she does not work weekends. The activity staff member indicated that it would probably be the direct care staff.

7. On 3/2/17 at 5:00 P.M. Surveyor #1 informed the Administrator of the resident concerns about the lack of activities when the activities staff member has left for the day and on weekends. The Administrator and DNS indicated they will have direct care staff provide activities on the off hours and the weekends.

Failed to provide housekeeping and maintenance services.

Based on the environmental tour and resident interviews, the facility failed to provide housekeeping and maintenance services to maintain a sanitary and orderly environment in the shower room and in the resident bathrooms.

Findings include:

1. On 2/28/17 during a tour of the facility between 8:00 A.M. and 9:30 A.M., Surveyors #1 and #2 observed the following:

  • a. First floor shower room: The ceiling vent was laden with dust. A basin on the shower room floor contained unlabeled personal care products such as: 3 disposable razors, a comb, a container of shaving gel, a container of skin cleanser and a container of peri fresh (wash). A sign in the hall by the shower room read: Per our infection control policy, please remember that all personal care products should be labeled with the resident name & are only to be used for that resident. This includes hair brushes & periwash.
  • b. First Floor common bathroom: The trash receptacle had no cover. The ceiling vent was dusty.
  • c. Second Floor windowless bathroom had peeling wall paper. The floor edges were lifting making it difficult to clean the perimeter of the room. The bathroom sink had a slow drain. The ceiling vent was dusty.
  • d. Second Floor bathroom opposite Room 207 had a bathroom sink faucet that did not stay on. This prevented handwashing as the resident would have to touch the faucet handles to keep the water running in order to wash hands. An unlabeled container of Derma Daily (skin cleanser) was kept on the bathroom sink.

On 2/28/17 at 1:30 P.M. during the group interview, 5 of 6 residents in attendance indicated that housekeeping services are inadequate in the facility. The residents indicated that the bathrooms on the first and second floor are not kept clean and feces is often observed on the toilet seat, on the floor by the toilet and even on the sink. On Wednesday, 3/1/17, Surveyor #1 observed the second floor windowless bathroom at 8:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M At those times, feces was observed on the toilet seat. On Wednesday, 3/1/17, Surveyor #1 observed the second floor bathroom opposite Room 207 at 10:00 A.M., 11:00 A.M. 12 Noon and 12:30 P.M. At those times, the toilet seat and toilet bowl had a large amount of feces and the room was odorous. At 12:30 P.M., Surveyor #1 showed the DNS (Director of Nursing Services) the feces on the toilet seat and bowl that had been there for more than 2 hours.

On 3/2/17 at 4:30 P.M., the Administrator said that there is no housekeeper scheduled on Wednesdays.

Failed to develop a complete care plan that meets all of a resident's needs, with timetables and actions that can be measured.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on record review and staff interview, the facility failed to develop and update care plans for 2 sampled residents (#5 and #7) in a total sample of 8 residents.

Findings include:

For Resident #7, the facility failed to ensure that an integrated care plan was developed to address his/her hospice care needs. On 3/2/17, review of the resident’s clinical record indicated that Resident #7 was initially admitted to the facility in 2/2016, with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Further record review indicated that on 2/10/17, the resident signed a hospice election to hospice on that date. A social service note dated 2/10/17 also indicated that the resident signed on for Hospice on that date.

On 3/2/17, review of the Interdisciplinary Care Plan indicated that the most recent care plan review was completed 11/22/16. The care plan was not updated to reflect the significant change in care, the provision of hospice care, that the resident had been receiving since 2/10/17. On 3/21/17 during an interview, the DNS (Director of Nursing Services) acknowledged a care plan was not developed to address the resident’s hospice care needs.

For Resident #5, the facility failed to update the resident’s care plans for Diversionary Activity Deficit and Mood. On 2/28/17, review of the resident’s clinical record indicated that Resident #5 was initially admitted to the facility in 8/2002 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of the annual MDS (minimum data set) dated 10/4/16 and the quarterly MDS dated [DATE] indicated that the resident had severely impaired cognitive skills. The 10/4/16 MDS indicated that the resident listened to music as a preference.

On all days of survey, the resident was observed to stay in his/her room throughout the day with soft music playing. Review of the care plan indicated that the facility would provide an activity calendar and daily schedule. When the surveyor requested to review the February 2017 activity calendar, the business manager said that the activity calendar is posted on the bulletin board on the first floor. No individual activity calendars are printed and provided to residents in their rooms.

Review of the Mood care plan last reviewed 1/4/17 indicated an approach to encourage socialization in activities as a therapeutic use of distraction. On 12/22/16 Social Service noted that the resident prefers his/her room and enjoys the bible and prayers. The most recent Activities Progress Note dated 7/12/16 noted that the resident likes to spend days in her room and have short conversations when staff visit. The contracted Psychiatric Service Progress Note dated 5/26/16 indicated that the resident prefers to stay in room. The care plan was not updated to reflect the facility’s practice to discontinue providing individual activity calendars and the care plan did not reflect the resident’s preference for quiet activities versus socialization in activities. The care plan was not evaluated and revised as needed.

Failed to make sure services provided by the nursing facility meet professional standards of quality.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, record review and staff interview, the facility failed to ensure that services provided meet professional standards of quality for two residents (#3 and #6) out of a total sample of 8 residents.

Findings include:

On 2/28/17, review of the clinical record indicated that Resident #6 was admitted to the facility in 10/2016. Resident #6’s medical [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. On 2/28/17, review of the admission Minimal Data Set (MDS) assessment dated as completed on 11/17/16, indicated that Resident #6 was cognitively intact and required total assistance of staff for activities of daily living. On 2/28/17, review of nurses notes for the month of February indicated that Resident #6 was on medical leave of absence from 2/15/17 through 2/17/17. On 2/28/17 at 4:00 P.M., The Surveyor observed Medication Nurse #1 administer medication to Resident #6 on the first floor. During the observation, Nurse #1 poured [MEDICATION NAME] (an anti-epileptic medication) 600 Milligrams (MG) tablet two tablets (1,200 MG) to administer to Resident #6 whereas, the medication blister pack from Pharmacy indicated to administer one 600 MG tablet of [MEDICATION NAME] twice daily to the Resident. The Surveyor asked the Nurse if she could explain the reason why the instruction on the medication blister pack from Pharmacy is different from the Medication Administration Record [REDACTED].

On 2/28/17, review of the physician’s orders [REDACTED].

– [MEDICATION NAME] 600 MG tablet, give one tablet by mouth two times daily at 12:00 P.M. and 4:00 P.M.

– [MEDICATION NAME] 600 MG tablet give two tablets (1,200 MG) by mouth two times daily.

On 2/28/17 at 4:30 P.M., during an interview, Nurse #1 said the order was changed. Nurse #1 was unable to show the new order that was obtained after the Resident returned from MLOA to the Surveyor. She said it was faxed to the Pharmacy. Further review of Resident # 6’s record and staff interview revealed that Resident #6’s new order to change [MEDICATION NAME] was not received by Pharmacy. In addition, there was no indication through record review that Resident #6’s medication order was reconciled to reflect the changes of his/her [MEDICATION NAME] medication order after being MLOA. Nurse #1 confirmed that she did not follow the appropriate standard of practice and the facility protocol for obtaining and transcribing physician’s orders [REDACTED].

For Resident #3, the Facility staff failed to ensure medication orders were written accurately. Resident #3 was admitted to the Facility in 1/2004 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. A review of the physician orders [REDACTED]. On 1/15/17 nursing took a telephone order from the physician that read: discontinue current PRN (as needed) Tylenol #3 order. The new Tylenol #3 order read: Tylenol #3, 2 tabs p.o. (by mouth) q (every) 6 hours. The new order did not indicate that the Tylenol #3 was a PRN (as needed) medication. The 1/2017 MAR (medication administration record) indicated that the 1/15/17 Tylenol #3 order was written on the MAR indicated [REDACTED]. On 3/1/17 during an interview, the medication nurse indicated that the 1/15/17 physician order [REDACTED].

Failed to provide care by qualified persons according to each resident's written plan of care.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on interview and record review, the facility failed to follow the weight protocol for 1 sampled Resident (#3) and failed to follow the medical plan of care for a Dietary consult out of a total sample of 8 residents.

Findings include:

Resident #3 was admitted to the facility in 1/2004 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of the resident’s monthly weights indicated that the resident lost 17 lbs between 11/2016 and 12/2016. The resident weighed 249 lbs on 11/1/16 and 236 lbs on 12/1/16. After the weight loss, weekly weights were obtained on 12/9/16 and 12/13/16. These weights indicated that the resident’s weight remained between 236 lbs and 232 lbs. A physician order [REDACTED]. Review of the Dietitian’s progress notes indicated the last nutrition status review by the Dietitian was done 12/7/16 and 12/13/16 prior to the physician order. On 3/1/17 at 10:45 A.M., Surveyor #1 inquired about the weight status of Resident #3. The DNS (director of nursing services) showed the surveyor the facility’s Weight Book and Weight Protocol instituted on 1/1/17.

Review of the Weight Protocol indicated to weigh residents the first week of each month and to document in the Weight Record and on Medication Record. The protocol further indicated to compare the weight to the previous month’s weight and begin Weight Action Plan for any of the following:

  • Weight increase 5 more lbs in 1 month
  • Weight decrease in 1 month 13 lbs for residents weighing 201 – 250 lbs.

Review of the weight book indicated the resident weighed 244 lbs in January 2017 (no specific date indicated) , an increase of 12 lbs in 1 month. Per the Weight Action Plan, staff are to check that weighing procedure was followed properly and reweigh resident. There was no evidence the resident was re-weighed as the next documented weight was 234 lbs on 2/24/17.

On 3/2/17 at 9:00 A.M., Surveyor #1 asked the Dietitian about the physician order [REDACTED]. The Dietitian checked the communication log at the nurses desk and noted there was no entry in the book for the Dietitian to see Resident #3. The Dietitian indicated that she would review the resident’s weight status at that time and document her findings. Review of the 3/2/17 Dietitian’s note indicated the Dietitian questioned the accuracy of the January 2017 weight but noted approximately 20 lb incremental weight decrease in the past year. The Dietitian recommended to continue the current diet and recommended 8 oz of an instant breakfast supplement as a meal supplement at any meal that the resident refuses to eat.

The facility failed to follow the Weight Protocol by not re-weighing the resident after a reported 12 lb weight gain in 1 month between 12/2016 and 1/2017 and failed to notify the Dietitian through the communication log of the physician’s orders [REDACTED].

Failed to keep the rate of medication errors (wrong drug, wrong dose, wrong time) to less than 5%.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, record review and staff interview, the facility failed to ensure that it was free of a medication error rate of 5 percent or greater. A Registered Nurse observed during the medication pass made errors while administering medications. Two medication errors out of 25 opportunities were observed during the medication pass observation for one non-sampled (NS) resident (NS#1) resulting in an error rate of 8%.

Findings include:

On 3/1/17 at 8:15 A.M., a medication pass observation was conducted with Nurse #1 on the first floor. A total of 25 opportunities for error was observed with Nurse #1. Two medications were not administered in accordance with the physician’s orders [REDACTED]. Nurse #1 failed to administer medications as per the physician order [REDACTED]. On 3/1/17, on reconciliation with the current physician’s orders [REDACTED].>1. Vitamin D3 (a fat-soluble vitamin that helps your body absorb calcium and phosphorus) 2000 Unit tablet. Administer one tablet by mouth once daily. Nurse #1 administered Vitamin D3/400 international unit (IU) soft gel to NS #1.

Calcium [MEDICATION NAME] (a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not enough) 600 Milligrams (MG) tablet. Administer 2 tablets to equal 1200 MG by mouth once daily. Nurse #1 administered calcium 1250 MG, one tab to NS #1. On 3/1/17 review of the Medication Administration Record [REDACTED]. On 3/1/17 at 8:30, during an interview, Nurse #1 confirmed that she did not follow the physician’s orders [REDACTED].#1 during the medication pass observation. On 3/2/17 at 5:40 P.M., the Director of Nursing was made aware of the 2 wrong doses of medications administered and that the Medication Pass Observation rate was 8%.

Failed to store, cook, and serve food in a safe and clean way

Based on observation of the kitchen’s storerooms and staff interview, the facility failed to ensure that food and dishware was stored under sanitary conditions.

Findings include:

The Kitchen/Food Service observation was conducted by Surveyor # 1 with the FSS (Food Service Supervisor) on 2/28/17. The following Kitchen sanitation concerns were observed: On 2/28/17 at 10:20 A.M., the dry food storage room in the basement was not maintained in a sanitary manner.

In the dry food store room, the food storage shelves were dirty with dust and cobwebs. The ceiling above the food storage shelves also had cobwebs. A three shelf unit containing food items was coated with dust and dirt. The corners of the room were cluttered with pieces of concrete from the wall and dirt. Unused equipment such as two refrigerator racks, were stored on the floor next to a refrigerator. An old mouse trap was also found there. The room window in close proximity to the food racks was laden with dirt and dust.

The paper goods storeroom shelves holding boxes and packages of disposable dishware was also dirty with dust and cobwebs. Review of the kitchen’s cleaning schedule indicated that the basement storage rooms were not included on the cleaning schedule.

The FSS indicated he would add the basement storage areas to the cleaning schedule and would ensure that the sanitation issues were corrected.

Failed to at least once a month, have a licensed pharmacist review each resident's medication(s) and report any irregularities to the attending doctor.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on record review and interview, for 7 of 8 sampled residents (Resident #1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and #7), the facility failed to ensure that the drug regimen of each resident was reviewed at least once a month by a licensed pharmacist.

Findings include:

On 2/28/17 at 11:30 A.M. during an interview, the DNS (Director of Nursing Services) said that the facility had contracted with a new pharmacy in 2016. On 3/1/17 review of the Pharmacy Services Agreement indicated the effective date of the agreement was 6/9/16. Record reviews throughout survey indicated the prior Pharmacy service terminated their monthly drug regimen reviews in 7/2016.

Record reviews indicated that monthly drug regimen reviews were not documented in the medical record for the following sampled residents:

  • a. Resident #1 was admitted in 2011. There was no documentation at the time of survey for pharmacy medication reviews for 8/2016, 11/2016, 12/2016, 1/2017 and 2/2017.
  • b. Resident #3 was admitted in 2004. There was no documentation at the time of survey for pharmacy medication reviews for 9/2016, 10/2016, 11/2016, 12/2016 and 2/2017.
  • c. Resident #5 was admitted in 2002. There was no documentation at the time of survey for pharmacy medication reviews for 8/2016, 10/2016, 11/2016, 12/2016, 1/2017 and 2/2017.
  • d. Resident #7 was admitted in 2/2016. There was no documentation at the time of survey for pharmacy medication reviews for 8/2016, 9/2016, 10/2016, 11/2016, 12/2016, 1/2017 and 2/2017.
  • e) Resident #2 was admitted in 8/2015 and had medical [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. On 2/28/17, review of the Medication Therapy Review indicated no pharmacy medication reviews for 8/2016, 10//2016, 11//2016, 12//2016, 1//2017 and 2/2017
  • f) Resident #4 was admitted to the facility in 3/2011 and had medical [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. On 3/01/17, review of the Medication Therapy Review indicated no pharmacy medication reviews for 9//2016, 10//2016 and 11//2016, 1/2017 and 2/2017.
  • g) Resident #6 was admitted to the facility in 10/2016 and medical [DIAGNOSES REDACTED].

On 3/01/17, review of the Medication Therapy Review indicated no pharmacy medication reviews for 11//2016, 12//2016 and 1//2017.

Failed to maintain drug records and properly mark/label drugs and other similar products according to accepted professional standards.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation of the medication storage cabinet and staff interview, the facility failed to ensure that over the counter medications, stored in the storage cabinet, were of current expiration date.

Findings include:

On [DATE] at 9:56 A.M., during a review of the medications storage cabinet with Nurse #2 in the basement, it was observed that the following medications were outdated:

  • a) Aspirin Enteric Coated (used to prevent blood clot) 81 Milligrams (MG) two bottles expired ,[DATE], one bottle expired ,[DATE] and 1 bottle expired ,[DATE]
  • b) Fiber Laxative (used for constipation) 625 MG caplet two bottles expired ,[DATE] and one bottle expired ,[DATE]
  • c) Extra Strength Soft gels (anti-gas medicine) 250 MG three bottles expired ,[DATE]

On [DATE] at 10:15 A.M., during an interview with Nurse # 2, she said that she was not aware that outdated medications were kept in the medications storage cabinet and not discarded.

Nurse #2 confirmed that the above outdated medications were available in the medications storage cabinet and removed them immediately. Nurse #2 shared these findings with the Director of Nursing to ensure the expired medication were discarded per the facility’s protocol.

Failed to make sure that a working call system is available in each resident's room or bathroom and bathing area.

Based on observation and staff interview, the Facility failed to provide a safe and functional environment for residents and staff when they failed to ensure that the laundry area was well maintained.

Findings include:

1. On 3/1/2017, at 9:15 A.M., Surveyor #1 observed the laundry with the Maintenance Director.

2. A sign on the clothes dryer read: clean lint traps daily. At that time, the Surveyor checked the lint trap and observed a heavy accumulation of lint on the screen and behind the screen, indicating the lint screen had not been cleaned daily.

3. The faucet of the handwash sink in the laundry area was not working properly and was in need of repair.

4. A piece of kitchen equipment, a Kitchen Aide Mixer, was stored on top of the washing machine.

5. Clothing belonging to discharged residents was strewn on a table containing lost and found clothing. A box of yarn left by a discharged resident was stored under the table on the floor. Two pillows left by a discharged resident sat on top of this box. A Hospice Communication book from a discharged resident was also on the table. The surveyor removed the Hospice Communication book and gave it to the DNS (Director of Nursing Services).

6. During an interview at that time, the Maintenance Director acknowledged that the Laundry area needed organization and the dryer lint screen should be cleaned after each use. In addition, the Maintenance Director said that he would try to obtain a lint screen vacuum attachment to clean the lint screen.

Samuel Marcus, Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help. Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim. Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation. Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear. If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately. Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

 

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case. Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect. We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.


Sources:

Page Last Updated: November 19, 2017

Call Now Button