Norwood Healthcare

Golden Living Center Norwood

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Norwood Healthcare? Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.

Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Norwood Healthcare

Golden Living Center Norwood

Norwood Healthcare is a for profit, 170-bed Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents of Westwood, Dedham, Canton,  Walpole, Sharon, Medfield, Needham, Stoughton, Milton and the other towns in and near Norfolk County, Massachusetts.

Norwood Healthcare
460 Washington St
Norwood, MA 02062

Phone: (781) 769-2200
Website: http://www.goldenlivingcenters.com/locations-staff/find-care-location/welcome/golden-livingcenter-norwood-ma.aspx

CMS Star Quality Rating

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas.

As of 2017, Norwood Healthcare in Massachusetts received a rating of 1 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 1 out of 5 (Much Below Average)
State Health Inspections 1 out of 5 (Much Below Average)
Staffing 3 out of 5 (Average)
Quality Measures 2 out of 5 (Below Average)

Fines Against Norwood Healthcare

The Federal Government fined Golden Living Center Norwood $50,570 on 04/14/2016 for health and safety violations.

Fines and Penalties

Our Nursing Home Abuse Lawyers inspected government records and discovered Norwood Healthcare committed the following offenses:

Failed to hire only people with no legal history of abusing, neglecting or mistreating residents; or report and investigate any acts or reports of abuse, neglect or mistreatment of residents.

Based on records reviewed and interviews, for one of 3 sampled residents (Resident #1), the Facility failed to report an allegation of misappropriation to the State Agency (Department of Public Health (DPH)) within 2 hours as required. Resident #1 reported an allegation of misappropriation to the Administrator on 02/06/17, but a report was not submitted to the DPH until 02/11/17.

Findings include:

Based on records reviewed and interviews, for one of 3 sampled residents (Resident #1), the Facility failed to report an allegation of misappropriation to the State Agency (Department of Public Health (DPH)) within 2 hours as required. Resident #1 reported an allegation of misappropriation to the Administrator on 02/06/17, but a report was not submitted to the DPH until 02/11/17.

The Facility’s internal investigation indicated that the Administrator was notified on 02/06/17 of an alleged incident of misappropriation. The investigation indicated that the alleged incident was not reported to the DPH until 02/11/17, 5 days after the initial report to the Administrator.

The Surveyor interviewed the Administrator at multiple times on 04/05/17. The Administrator said that on 02/06/17, Resident #1 reported that a person, identified by the Facility as Housekeeper #1, had written out and cashed a check for $100.00 from Resident #1’s bank account without Resident #1’s permission or knowledge. The Administrator said he reported the alleged incident of misappropriation to the DPH on 02/11/17. The Administrator confirmed that the abuse policy provided to the Surveyor was the Facility’s current policy. The Administrator said he was not aware that the Facility was required to report allegations of abuse, neglect, exploitation or mistreatment, including injuries of unknown source and misappropriation of resident property to the DPH within 2 hours. There was no documentation at the time of survey that Resident #1’s allegation of misappropriation was reported to the DPH within 2 hours as required. The alleged incident was not reported until 5 days after the Facility was notified of the alleged incident by Resident #1.

Failed to provide care for residents in a way that keeps or builds each resident's dignity and respect of individuality.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation and interview, the facility failed to provide a dignified and respectful environment for residents on 3 of 4 units by: A. respect resident’s room privacy and personal space for 1 resident, (#12), out of a total sample of 22 residents; B. responding appropriately to residents in need or with behaviors; and C. providing a dignified dinning experience for residents who eat in dining areas and in their rooms.

Findings include:

A. For Resident #12, the facility failed to respect his/her room privacy and personal space.

Resident #12 was initially admitted to the facility in 2012 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Resident #12 resides on the 1N unit.

During initial report from Nurse #1 on 5/3/17 at 7:25 A.M., she said that Resident #12 is non-verbal and requires total care for all activities of daily living. During room observations of Resident #12’s room on 5/3/17 at 12:22 P.M., a cell phone was noted on a nightstand and another was noted behind Resident #12’s television. In addition to the cellphone behind the television a set of car keys was noted.

During interview with Nurse #2 on 5/3/17 12:25 P.M., she confirmed that Resident #12 does not have a roommate and that he/she would physically be unable to utilize a phone due to his/her diagnoses. At that time, the Assistant Director of Nursing, (ADON), arrived on the unit and toured Resident #12’s room with Surveyor #3. He removed the phones and car keys and said he would follow up with the Survey team. At 2:09 P.M., the ADON alerted Surveyor #3 that the items did not belong to the resident, but to staff members who were utilizing Resident #12’s room to store their personal items and charge their personal phone. He added that the facility staff had been recently educated to not use resident rooms or other resident areas for personal use and that staff would be re-educated.

On 5/3/17 at 7:57 A.M., Surveyor #3 observed the Central Supply staff person and Nurse #2 having a conversation in Resident #12’s room while Resident #12 was laying in bed with the TV on. Nurse #2 then exited the room and gave a resident in the hallway the medications she was holding in her hand. During interview with the Central Supply staff person at 8:11 A.M., on 5/3/17, she said that she was asked by Nurse #2 to bring up a medication that was not in the medcart and that was why they were conversing in Resident #12’s room. She said she was not sure who the medication was for. When asked why they would speak in Resident #12’s room while the resident is resting in bed and watching TV, she said, I really didn’t think about it. He/she is usually not in there, or words to that effect.

B. Surveyor #3 made the following observations of Activities Programming on 5/4/17 from 8:50 A.M., to 10:50 A.M., on the 2S unit which houses multiple residents with dementia and behaviors.

At 9:29 A.M., a resident was asked by the Activities Assistant #1 to read from the handout given out in the activities room. The resident was struggling to read the paper and said that he/she has a difficult time reading without his/her glasses. Activities Assistant #1 then offered to get his/her glasses, and the resident declined. Activities Assistant #1 then said, well next time, bring them with you or ask someone to bring them for you, or words to that effect.

At 10:35 A.M., a resident poked Activities Assistant #1 on the buttocks. Activities Assistant #1 turned around and told the resident that that behavior was inappropriate. The resident then giggled. Activities Assistant #1 then motioned towards an empty seat in the corner of the room and told the resident, Why don’t you sit over there? I don’t want you behind me, or words to that effect. The resident did not move and Activity Assistant #1 continued the activity taking place.

During review of the Dementia Training records for 2016 on 5/8/17 at 11:15 A.M., the records reviewed indicated that Activities Assistant #1 did not receive Dementia Training as required.

C. Review of the CMS federal guidelines 4803.10(a)(1) indicate that to promote a dignified experience during dining practices includes refraining from the use of labels and to remain at eye level and sit while assisting residents with meals.

Review of the facility’s cellphone policy indicated that cellphone use is not permitted in resident areas unless it is for business related purposes. On 5/3/17 Surveyor #3 made the following observations:

At 8:24 A.M., in the 2S dining area, 1 resident was seated at a table without a meal, while 2 others at his/her table were eating. The staff nurse said that the resident without his/her meal was a feeder, or words to that effect, and she would be assisting that resident shortly.

At 8:25 A.M., CNA #1 was observed preparing food items on Resident #15’s plate in his/her room. At 8:38 A.M., CNA #1 left the room and returned at 8:52 A.M., to assist him/her with breakfast. At 8:57 A.M., Surveyor #3 entered the room and observed CNA #1 standing and looking at her personal cellphone in her hand. Upon seeing the surveyor enter the room, she placed her phone in her pocket and continued to assist the resident with eating his/her meal while standing.

At 12: 04 P.M., a staff person was observed standing while feeding Resident #15 in his/her room.

On 5/4/17, Surveyor #3 made the following observations:

At 6:43 A.M., an aide was observed in the Opal/TV room , (on the 1S unit), seated in a chair on his/her cellphone. During interview with Nuse #1 at 6:45 A.M., she said that no staff were currently on break as it is change of shift and the incoming aides should be meeting with the outgoing aides to get report. On 5/5/17, Surveyor #3 made the following observations: At 8:30 A.M., a nurse in the Garnet Dining Room asked a CNA about putting bibs on residents prior to the meals being delivered. On 5/8/17, Surveyor #3 made the following observations: At 12:47 P.M., an aide was observed standing while feeding a resident on the 2S unit in room [ROOM NUMBER]. At 12:48 P.M., an aide was observed standing while feeding a resident on the 2S unit in the dining room.

Failed to provide care by qualified persons according to each resident's written plan of care.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, record review and interview, the facility failed to follow physician’s orders and careplans for 2 residents, (#6, #8), out of a total sample of 22 residents.

Findings include:

1. For Resident #6, the facility failed to follow physician’s orders and his/her careplan regarding the release of a restraint.

Resident #6 was admitted to the facility with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of Resident #6’s current physician’s orders indicated the following: use of self-releasing velcro belt to wheelchair, remove and reapply every two hours, every day and evening shift, (initiated 12/8/16).

Review of Resident #6’s Physical Restraint Careplan dated 6/14/16 indicated an intervention to check his/her seatbelt every 30 minutes and release every two hours. On 5/4/17, Surveyor #3 made direct observations of Resident #6 from 8:50 A.M., to 10:50 A.M. Throughout that duration, no staff checked the belt every 30 minutes as indicated in his/her careplan, or released the belt per physician’s orders at the end of the two hours. During interview with CNA #2, on 5/4/17 at 10:57 A.M., she said that she releases Resident #6’s seatbelt during breakfast and lunch and that she was unsure of what happens in the evenings or nights as she does not work those shifts.

The above observations and concerns were discussed with the Director of Nursing, (DON), and the Administrator on 5/4/17 at 11:50 A.M.

2. The facility failed to follow physician’s orders for Resident #8 in regards to his/her arm splint.

Resident #8 was admitted to the facility in 2001 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of Resident #8’s current physician’s orders indicated the following: Resident to wear right hand splint 6-8 hours per day, to be put on in AM and to remove at 4:00 P.M., (initiated 10/13/15).

On 5/4/17, Resident #8 was observed at 1:38 P.M., in the dining area without the hand splint. Review of the TAR on 5/5/17 indicated Nurse #6 signed off that he/she was wearing the splint on 5/4/17.

On 5/5/17 at 9:04 A.M., Resident #8 was observed in the dining area and was not wearing the splint. During interview with Nurse #6 on 5/5/17 at 10:36 A.M., she said that she thought that the wrist splint had been d/c’d by the physician and that she would have to check. During follow up interview with Nurse #6 at 12:53 P.M., she said that she had misunderstood the order and put the splint on Resident #8’s hand.

Failed to give residents proper treatment to prevent new bed (pressure) sores or heal existing bed sores.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, record review and staff interview, the facility failed to ensure that a resident’s air mattress was functioning and in proper therapeutic settings for 1 resident, (#7), with a pressure ulcer, out of a total sample of 22 residents.

Findings include:

Resident #7 was admitted to the facility in 9/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of medical records indicates that Resident #7 has a stage 4 Pressure Wound on Sacrum and a Shear Wound on the Right Buttocks. The Resident is also being seen by Wound Care Specialist weekly.

Review of Resident #7’s physician’s orders [REDACTED].

Review of Resident #7’s Care Plan initiated 9/22/16 indicated: Provide Pressure reduction/relieving mattress.

On 5/5/2017 at 8:20 A.M., Resident #7 was observed asleep in bed. Surveyor #2 noted that Resident was on Alternating Pressure Mattress, (designed to help reduce pressure to aid in prevention and treatment of [REDACTED]. Surveyor #2 notified Nurse #3 and he immediately turned the mattress on and told surveyor Somebody might have bumped into it and it shut off or words to that effect. Surveyor #2 observed that Nurse #3 did not check the settings/control after turning back on.

On 5/5/2017 at 10:30 A.M., Surveyor #2 returned to Resident #7’s room to observe his/her dressing change performed by Nurse #3. During the dressing change Surveyor #2 noted that the air mattress was set at number 8 which is in category of FIRM and based on weight of 315 pounds. Review of Resident #7’s most recent weight indicated he/she weighed 153.8 lbs. Nurse #3 was notified and adjusted the comfort control to number 4 and in category of SOFT.

The Assistant Director of Nursing and Nurse #3 were interviewed on separate occasions about air mattress adjustments for comfort and therapy settings and both said that therapy setting is based on a resident’s weight.

Failed to safely provide drugs and other similar products available, which are needed every day and in emergencies, by a licensed pharmacist

Based on observation and interview, the facility failed to ensure that the facility provided pharmaceutical services that assured the medication used in the facility is not expired.

Findings include:

On 5/4/17 at 9:10 A.M., medication pass was conducted by surveyor #2 in North 1 Unit with Medication Nurse (MN) #4. Surveyor #2 observed two bottles of Aspirin 325 mg in the medication cart with the expiration dates of 08/2016 and 02/2017 respectively and both unsealed MN #3 acknowledge that both bottles of Aspirin 325 mg had expired and should had been taken out from the medication cart.

Failed to have a program that investigates, controls and keeps infection from spreading.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, interview and review of the facility policy, the facility failed to follow proper infection control practices for the prevention and spread of infection for 1 (#3) out of a total of 22 sampled residents.

Findings include:

Resident # 3 was admitted to the facility in 4/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. On 5/5/17, at 11:10 A.M., Nurse#7 notified Surveyor #1 that she was about to start a pressure wound dressing change on Resident #3. Surveyor #1 entered Resident #3’s room, and Resident #3 was lying supine in bed with his/her feet elevated. Nurse #7 and a CNA were in the room. Nurse #7 unhooked Resident #3’s Foley bag from the side of the bed and placed it on the foot of the bed, which was elevated and above Resident #3’s bladder allowing the contents of the Foley bag to flow back into Resident#3’s bladder. Surveyor #1 asked Nurse #7 about the placement of the Foley bag and she replied that should not be placed above/higher than the resident or words to that effect. Nurse #7 then removed the Foley bag from the bed and hung it on the side of the bed, below the height of Resident #3. Nurse #7 then rolled Resident #3 onto his/her side and the CNA held Resident #3 in place on his/her side. Resident #3 verbalized that he/she was comfortable in that position. Nurse #7 then removed Resident#3’s dressing which was located on the coccyx and buttocks. Nurse #7 then removed her gloves and donned a new pair of gloves (without washing her hands). Nurse #7 proceeded to open a bottle of saline and pour it on previously opened gauze and clean the wound with the gauze and immediately discard the gauze into a bag. Without washing her hands, Nurse #7 then used dry gauze to pat the wound dry. Nurse #7 then opened a packet of [MEDICATION NAME] Alginate dressing and cut the dressing into smaller pieces with scissors. Nurse #7 then placed the smaller pieces of the [MEDICATION NAME] dressing into Resident #3’s wound bed. At no time did Nurse #7 perform hand hygiene.

At 11:16, Surveyor #1 asked Nurse #7 about the steps taken to change the dressing and if she normally performs hand hygiene during dressing changes. Nurse #7 acknowledged that she should have performed hand hygiene before donning new gloves during the dressing change. Review of the Policy/Procedure reads: Step 4. Open dressing pack. Step 5. Perform hand hygiene. Step 8. Dispose of gloves in plastic bag. Step 9. Perform hand hygiene. At 12:15 P.M., Surveyor #1 interviewed the Director of Nursing (DON) about the dressing change. The DON stated that Nurse #7 should have performed hand hygiene during the dressing change.

Failed to train all employees on what to do in an emergency, and carry out announced staff drills.

Based on observation and interview, the facility failed to provide functioning emergency equipment for one out of four units surveyed.

Findings include:

On 5/4/17, at 10:30 A.M., Surveyor #1 was at the South 2, Nurses station. Surveyor #1 noted that the Oxygen tank on the emergency cart was empty. When the Oxygen was turned on, the arrow on the gauge pointed to the red section of the gauge reading Refill. The flash light on the cart only dimly lit when turned on for a moment before going out. The suction machine’s gauge was missing the casing leaving the suction measurement dial exposed. The dial was dented and bent and the needle permanently was set on 8 when the machine was off. When the suction machine was turned on the needle indicating amount of suction did not move and the strength of the suction could not be measured.

At 10:45 A.M., Surveyor #1 reviewed the emergency cart with Nurse #3, who stated that’s broken when seeing the suction machine. The nurse acknowledged that the O2 tank was empty and the suction machine needed to be replaced.

At 11:00 A.M., the Director of Nurses (DON) was informed about the Emergency Cart. She acknowledged that the cart should have a new suction machine and that the Oxygen tanks should be full.

Failed to hire only people with no legal history of abusing, neglecting or mistreating residents; or report and investigate any acts or reports of abuse, neglect or mistreatment of residents.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on record review and interview, the facility failed to investigate and report an allegation of abuse for 1 resident, (#17), out of a total of 22 sampled residents.

Findings include:

Resident #17 was admitted to the facility initially in 2003 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Surveyor #3 reviewed Resident #17’s clinical record on 5/8/17 at 9:15 A.M. The clinical record indicated that Resident #17 was admitted to the hospital on [DATE]. The hospital admission paperwork indicated that Resident #17 was weepy and alleged that he/she was being abused by staff at the facility.

Review of the facility’s Abuse Policy dated, 5/3/17 indicated the following: All employees shall immediately report to the designated supervisor in charge all alleged violations involving allegations of abuse. 2 Hour reports: An initial report to the state survey agency and law enforcement must be made within two hours if a patient sustains allegations of abuse.

At 9:34 A.M., on 5/8/17, Surveyor #3 requested to review the facility investigation regarding Resident #17’s allegations of abuse from the Director of Nursing, (DON). At 1:40 P.M., on 5/8/17, the DON met with Surveyor #3 and reported that administration was not aware of the allegation made by Resident #17 when he/she returned from the hospital, so an investigation and a report to the state survey agency was not done. She said that the facility was currently in the process of conducting an investigation and in the process of reporting the allegation to the state survey agency as required.

Failed to develop a complete care plan that meets all of a resident's needs, with timetables and actions that can be measured.

The Suicide Prevention and Intervention Guideline Policy, effective 2/19/16, indicated that an immediate written care plan should be developed and implemented specific to the resident’s situation and needs. The policy indicated that the plan should outline interventions and monitoring for the resident to remain safe. The policy indicated that, when the resident is no longer considered acutely suicidal, that the Facility would develop a precautionary plan to provide ongoing monitoring and assessment of the resident’s mood and status and interventions to meet his/her needs.

Resident #1’s Admission Minimum Data Set Assessment (MDS) Form, completed 5/29/17, indicated that Resident #1 was admitted to the Facility in May 2017, he/she was cognitively intact, and his/her [DIAGNOSES REDACTED].

The Psychopharmacology Noted, dated 5/31/17, indicated that Resident #1’s [DIAGNOSES REDACTED].

The Police Report, dated 6/12/17, indicated that a reporting party stated she had seen Resident #1’s posting on a social media website about suicide and depression and wanted a well-being check. The Police Report indicated that Police Officer #1 went to the Facility and spoke with Resident #1, the DON and Charge Nurse #2. The Police Report indicated both the DON and Charge Nurse #2 were aware of Resident #1’s posts on the social media website and they were monitoring Resident #1 with 30 minute interval checks.

The Physician’s Note, dated 6/13/17, indicated that Resident #1 was sent to the emergency room at the hospital as a transfer for suicidal ideation and possible inpatient psychiatric hospitalization .

The Resident Transfer Form, dated 6/13/17, indicated the reason for Resident #1’s transfer to the hospital was due to an anonymous call to the Facility that stated Resident #1 was posting for help (posting on an on-line social media site), that Resident #1 was suicidal and wanted to put a plastic bag over his/her head, and Resident #1 confirmed this information.

The Hospital Discharge Summary, dated 6/13/17, indicated the reason for Resident #1’s visit (to the hospital) was for Suicidal Ideation (SI), and he/she was treated at the Outpatient Psychiatry.

Review of the Resident’s medical record, on 6/14/17, indicated that the Facility failed to ensure that there was a comprehensive plan of care addressing the Resident #1’s [DIAGNOSES REDACTED].

The care plan to address Resident #1’s Suicidal Ideation was initiated on 6/15/17, one day after the Survey, three days after Resident #1’s most recent suicidal ideation, and 24 days after admission.

The Surveyor interviewed the Director of Nurses (DON) at 9:30 A.M., throughout the day on 6/14/17, and at 4:40 P.M. on 6/19/17. The DON said that there should have been a Care Plan in place on 6/12/17, regarding Resident #1’s suicidal ideation, when the police were called by a friend and the police came to the facility on [DATE].

The DON said the expectation was that, on 6/12/17, the nurses on the unit would put have put a care plan in place regarding Resident #1’s suicidal ideation. When the Surveyor asked the DON who did the care planning now for residents, the DON said words to the effect, I don’t know. The DON said that she would expect the nurse would have done the care plan for Resident #1 but that she had not gotten to work that out yet. The Director of Nurses said Resident #1 had a Care Plan for Suicidal Ideation started on 6/15/17, the day after the Department of Public Health survey was completed.

Failed to make sure that the nursing home area is free from accident hazards and risks and provides supervision to prevent avoidable accidents

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on interviews, records reviewed, and observation, for one of three sampled residents (Resident #1), the Facility failed to ensure that Resident #1’s bathroom and bedroom remained free from plastic bags (accident hazards) after Resident #1 reported that he/she had a plan to commit suicide by putting a plastic bag over his/her head and using the oxygen cord from his/her oxygen tank to secure the plastic bag around his/her head. On 6/14/17, at approximately 4:15 P.M., the Director of Nurses (DON), Resident #1, and the Surveyor observed approximately 6 plastic bags in Resident #1’s bedroom and 1 plastic bag in Resident #1’s bathroom, approximately 14 hours after Resident #1 returned from the hospital for a psychiatric evaluation due to suicidal ideation.

Findings include:

Resident #1’s Admission Minimum Data Set Assessment (MDS) Form, completed 5/29/17, indicated that Resident #1 was admitted to the Facility in May 2017, he/she was cognitively intact and his/her [DIAGNOSES REDACTED].

The Suicide Prevention and Intervention Guideline Policy, effective 2/19/16, indicated that the assessment process should include the resident’s environment for potential safety issues and removal of any items that could be a hazard to the resident.

The Police Report, dated 6/12/17, indicated that a reporting party stated she had seen Resident #1’s posting on a social media website about suicide and depression and wanted a well-being check. The Police Report indicated that Police Officer #1 went to the Facility and spoke with the DON and Charge Nurse #2, and Resident #1. The Police Report indicated that both the DON and Charge Nurse #2 were aware of Resident #1’s posts on the social media website that indicated Resident #1 planned to wrap a plastic bag around his/her head, face, and neck so that he/she would not survive the suicide.

The Hospital Discharge Summary, dated 6/13/17, indicated the reason for Resident #1’s visit (to the hospital) was for Suicidal Ideation (SI), and he/she was treated at the Outpatient Psychiatry.

The Psychopharmacology Noted, dated 5/31/17, indicated that Resident #1’s [DIAGNOSES REDACTED].

The Resident Transfer Form, completed by Charge Nurse #1 and dated 6/13/17, indicated the reason for Resident #1’s transfer to the hospital was due to an anonymous call made to the Facility that stated Resident #1 was posting for help (on an on-line social media site), Resident #1 was suicidal and wanted to put a plastic bag over his/her head, and Resident #1 confirmed this information.

The Social Media website posting, dated 6/12/17, indicated Resident #1 said, words to the effect, I am starting to have suicidal ideation’s and I am having to strangle myself with my oxid (oxygen tubing), only this time to ensure the actuality of not surviving this suicide attempt, I will make sure to wrap a plastic bag around my head and face and tie it at my neck so that I will not survive.

The Physician’s Note, dated 6/13/17, indicated that Resident #1 was sent to the emergency room at the hospital as a transfer for suicidal ideation and possible inpatient psychiatric hospitalization .

At 4:15 P.M. on 6/14/17, the Surveyor, the Director of Nurses (DON), and Resident #1 observed 6 plastic bags in Resident #1’s bedroom, 3 were large, clear, plastic bags and 3 were small, white, grocery-sized bags which had belongings in them, and 1 plastic bag in trash can in Resident #1’s bathroom. These plastic bags were observed by the Surveyor, the DON, and Resident #1 in Resident #1’s room approximately 18.5 hours after Resident #1 returned from the hospital for a psychiatric evaluation due to Suicidal Ideation. The Surveyor observed the DON, with Resident #1’s permission, remove the 6 plastic bags from Resident #1’s bedroom and 1 plastic bag from Resident #1’s bathroom, for a total of 7 plastic bags.

The Surveyor interviewed the Director of Nurses at 9:30 A.M., at 4:30 P.M., throughout the day on 6/14/17, and at 4:40 P.M. on 6/19/17. The DON said Resident #1’s postings on a social media website on 6/12/17 stated that Resident #1 wanted to attempt suicide by wrapping a plastic bag around his/her head and using the oxygen cord around the bag. The DON said she removed plastic trash bags from Resident #1’s bathroom on 6/13/17 and told Housekeeping staff to not put plastic trash bags in Resident #1’s room. The DON said she did not remove the large, clear plastic bag with Resident #1’s clothing in it that was on the top of a large paper box in Resident #1’s bed room on 6/13/17 or another plastic bag filled with personal items on the floor in Resident #1’s bedroom because she did not want to go through his/her belongings without Resident #1 there and when she left the building on 6/13/17, Resident #1 was not back yet from the hospital.

The Surveyor interviewed Physician #1 at 3:15 P.M. on 6/19/17. Physician #1 said that on 6/13/17, the DON mentioned to her that Resident #1 had suicidal ideation and he/she had a plan to put a plastic bag over his/her head. Physician #1 said she ordered Resident #1 to be transferred to the hospital on [DATE] for a psychiatric evaluation and possible admission to the hospital.

The Surveyor interviewed Charge Nurse #1 at 4:00 P.M. on 6/19/17. Charge Nurse #1 said on 6/13/17, Resident #1 was sent out to the hospital for a psychiatric evaluation due to suicidal ideation. Charge Nurse #1 said she was not aware that Resident #1 had a plan to put a plastic bag over his/her head and to use the oxygen tubing to strangle himself/herself. Charge Nurse #1 said Resident #1 told her, on 6/13/17, words to the effect, If I was going to kill myself, I would have killed myself last night.

The Surveyor interviewed Charge Nurse #2 at 4:35 P.M. on 6/14/17. Charge Nurse #2 said she knew that Resident #1 had suicidal ideation but was not aware that Resident #1 had a plan or that the plan involved putting a plastic bag over his/her head and using the oxygen cord to strangle him/herself with the cord. Charge Nurse #2 said when Resident #1 returned to the Facility at approximately 9:50 P.M. on 6/13/17, she did not ask Resident #1 if she could remove any plastic bags from his/her room. Charge Nurse said words to the effect, that Resident #1 was particular about his/her belongings.

The Surveyor interviewed Charge Nurse #3 at 12:55 P.M. on 6/20/17. Charge Nurse #3 said on 6/13/17, Charge Nurse #2 told him that Resident #1 had expressed suicidal ideation on 6/13/17 and had been transferred to the hospital and returned the same night. Charge Nurse #3 said at change of shift, Charge Nurse #2 told him that Resident #1 said if he/she wanted to commit suicide, then he/she could use a plastic bags and the oxygen tubing to do that. Charge Nurse #3 said that he did not go into Resident #1’s room during that shift and he did not search Resident #1’s room for plastic bags. Charge Nurse #3 said he could not just search Resident #1’s room and staff were not allowed to do that.

The Surveyor interviewed Charge Nurse #4 at 10:00 A.M. on 6/21/17. Charge Nurse #4 said, on the morning of 6/14/17, she received report from Charge Nurse #3 who told her that Resident #1 was suicidal and was on 15 minute checks. Charge Nurse #4 said she overheard that Resident #1’s suicidal ideation had something to do with trash bags but to not worry about it because the trash bags were removed from his/her room. Charge Nurse #4 said she did not search Resident #1’s room for (plastic) trash bags because Resident #1 was sleeping.

The Surveyor interviewed Family Member #1 at 12:05 P.M. on 6/19/17. Family Member #1 said Resident #1 had suicidal ideation for the past few years. Family Member #1 said she saw what Resident #1 had posted, on 6/12/17, on the social media web site and how Resident #1 had a plan to use a plastic bag over his/her head and to use the oxygen tubing to wrap around his/her neck.

The Surveyor interviewed Resident #1 at 2:30 P.M. on 6/14/17. Resident #1 gave the Surveyor his/her cellular phone to read the posting the social media website from 6/12/17. The Surveyor read aloud the posting in front of and with Resident #1’s permission. Resident #1 confirmed to the Surveyor that there were typos in his/her posting but that oxid was the oxygen tubing and that he/she wanted to put a plastic bag over his/her head and use the oxygen tubing to wrap the plastic bag around his/her neck in order to commit suicide.

Norwood Healthcare, Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help. Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim. Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation. Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear. If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately. Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case. Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect. We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.

Sources:

Medicare Nursing Home Profiles and Reports – Norwood Healthcare

Nursing Home Inspection, Safety and Deficiency Report – Norwood Healthcare – 04/05/2017

Nursing Home Inspection, Safety and Deficiency Report – Norwood Healthcare – 05/08/2017

Nursing Home Inspection, Safety and Deficiency Report – Norwood Healthcare – 06/14/2017

Page Last Updated: December 13, 2017

 

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