Taunton Nursing Home

Taunton Nursing Home

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Taunton Nursing Home?  Our lawyers can help.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear.  If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately.  Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

About Taunton Nursing Home

The Taunton Nursing Home is a government owned non-profit Nursing Home with 101 beds. It is a Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents of Taunton, Raynham, Middleboro, Berkley, Dighton, Rehobeth and the surrounding towns in Bristol County, Massachusetts. The nursing home offers short-term care and long-term care.

Taunton Nursing Home
350 Norton Avenue
Taunton, MA 02780

Phone: (508) 822-1132

CMS Star Quality Rating

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas. As of 2017, The Taunton Nursing Home received a rating of 2 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 2 out of 5 (Below Average)
State Health Inspections 1 out of 5 (Much Below Average)
Staffing 3 out of 5 (Average)
Quality Measures 2 out of 5 (Below Average)

Fines Against the Taunton Nursing Home

The Federal Government fined The Taunton Nursing Home $23,563 in 2014 for health and safety violations. Government records show that the Taunton Nursing Home in Taunton, Massachusetts committed the following offenses:

12/05/2014 Provide care for each resident in a way that keeps or builds the resident's quality of life.

Based on interview and record review, 7 residents were sexually assaulted by a single resident.

Resident #1:

  • Placed Resident #2’s hand on his/her exposed penis
  • Forced Resident #3 to masturbate his/her exposed penis
  • Placed his/her hand in Resident #5’s crotch
  • Placed Resident #6’s hand in Resident #1’s crotch
  • Grabbed Resident #7’s breast hard
  • Placed the hands of additional, unidentified residents, on his/her exposed penis, aggressively grabbed and placed his/her hand in their crotches and under their pants.

Findings include:

  • Resident #1’s Care Plan for Cognitive Deficits, dated [DATE], indicated Resident #1 had cognitive deficits including confusion, disorientation and impaired short and long-term memory.
  • Resident #1’s Nurse’s Note, indicated at 11:00 A.M., a staff member found Resident #1 in the hallway with his/her hand on a resident’s (unidentified) shirt. The Nurse’s Note indicated Resident #1 was redirected twice as he/she proceeded to re-approach the same resident.Resident #1’s Nurse’s Note, indicated a staff member discovered Resident #1 in the hallway with his/her hands in a resident’s (unidentified) pants.
  • Resident #1’s Patient Care Referral Form indicated staff  found Resident #1 with his/her hand down a resident’s (unidentified) pants on two occasions. The Referral Form indicated , staff observed Resident #1 stroking a resident’s  abdomen and stroking another resident’s (unidentified) arm.
  • Surveyor #1 interviewed Social Worker #1 at 11:10 A.M. . Social Worker #1 said she did not know the identities of all of the residents, or the exact number of residents, mentioned in the Referral Form.
  • Surveyor #1 interviewed the Director of Nurses at 3:20 P.M.. The Director of Nurses said she did not know the names of the residents who were the victims of unwelcome sexual contact by Resident #1.
  • Resident #5’s Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment indicated he/she had memory deficits, severely impaired cognitive skills.
  • Resident #5’s Nurse’s Note indicated a resident was redirected after inappropriately touching (Resident #5), or words to that effect.
    Surveyor #1 interviewed Social Worker #1. Social Worker #1 said that Resident #1 placed his/her hand between Resident #5’s legs. Resident #5 died prior to the investigation.
  • Resident #2’s Care Plan for Cognitive Deficits indicated Resident #2 had cognitive deficits, impaired decision-making.

The Incident Report Form, indicated Resident #1 wheeled himself/herself in his/her wheelchair over to Resident #2’s chair, in which Resident #2 slept. The Incident Report indicated Resident #2 received Hospice services and spent time resting in a chair when out of bed. The Incident Report indicated Resident #1 took his/her penis out of his/her pants and then took Resident #2’s right hand and put it over his/her penis.

Although Resident #1’s plan of care indicated he/she was not to be seated next to female residents, the plan was not re-evaluated despite repeated incidents in which Resident #1 touched other cognitively impaired residents in a sexual manner for a period of more than 5 months. Their care plan lacked a formal plan regarding how staff would ensure Resident #1 did not continue to have access to female residents when he/she was placed increased supervision.

12/05/2014 Nursing facility failed to provide medically-related social services to help each resident achieve the highest possible quality of life.

The Facility failed to address several residents’ emotional needs after Resident #1 made unwelcome sexual contact toward them on 5/7/14, 5/8/14 and 5/9/14.

Findings include:Resident #1’s Patient Care Referral Form, dated 5/9/14, indicated on 5/7/14, staff found Resident #1 with his/her hand down a resident’s pants. The Referral Form indicated on 5/8/14, staff again found Resident #1 with his/her hand down a resident’s pants. The Referral Form indicated on 5/9/14, staff observed Resident #1 stroking a resident’s abdomen and stroking, another resident’s arm. The Referral form did not identify the names of the residents to whom Resident #1 made unwelcome sexual acts. Resident #1’s Nurse’s Note, dated 5/8/14, indicated at 11:00 A.M., a staff member found Resident #1 in the hallway with his/her hand on a resident’s (unidentified) shirt. The Note indicated Resident #1 was redirected twice as he/she proceeded to re-approach the same resident.

Resident #1’s Social Service Note, dated 5/8/14, indicated staff found Resident #1 with his/her hands underneath the underwear of a female resident (unidentified). Resident #1’s Nurse’s Note, dated 5/9/14 (late entry for 5/8/14) indicated a staff member discovered Resident #1 in the hallway with his/her hands in a resident’s (unidentified) pants and at the same time Resident #1 touched his/her own genitals. Review of the Facility’s incident reports, dated May 2014, indicated there were no reports which referenced the 5/7/14, 5/8/14 and 5/9/14 incidents involving Resident #1. Surveyor #1 interviewed Social Worker #1 at 11:10 A.M. on 12/2/14. Social Worker #1 said she did not know the identities of all of the residents, or the exact number of residents, mentioned in the Referral Form, dated 5/9/14. Social Worker #1 said Resident #5 was one of these affected residents and she notified Resident #5’s family member that Resident #1 had placed his/her hand between Resident #5’s legs.

Social Worker #1 said there was no Facility documentation to indicate either staff, or psychiatric consultants, addressed the emotional needs of the residents mentioned in the Referral Form who were touched by Resident #1.

12/05/2014 Provide housekeeping and maintenance services.

Based on observation of the physical environment and staff interviews, the facility failed to maintain the resident environment in a safe clean, homelike and comfortable manner.

12/05/2014 Nursing home failed to make sure services provided by the nursing facility meet professional standards of quality.

Based on record/document review, staff witness statements and interviews, and interview with the resident, the facility failed to ensure that a licensed nurse administered medications in accordance with the physician’s orders. Also, the facility failed to adequately monitor the nurse’s performance following the significant medication errors and falsification of medical records.
Pursuant to Massachusetts General Law (M.G.L.), chapter 112, individuals are given the designation of Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse which includes the responsibility to provide nursing care. Pursuant to the Code of Massachusetts Regulation (CMR) 244, Rules and Regulations 3.02 and 3.04 define the responsibilities and functions of a Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse respectively. The regulations stipulate that both the Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse bear full responsibility for systematically assessing health status and recording the related health data. They also stipulate that both the Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse incorporate into the plan of care, and implement prescribed
medical regimens.

Findings included:

Resident #18 was admitted and according to the most recent MDS (Minimum Data Set), signed as being completed 9/8/14, the resident scored a 15 of 15 on the BIMS (Brief Interview of Mental Status) and was independent with ADLs (Activities of Daily Living). The MDS indicated that the resident had 10 out of 10 pain on a scale of 1-10, coded as almost constant, which affected the resident’s daily function.

The resident’s medical record, and an incident report for a medication error made on 9/23/14, were both reviewed on 12/3/14. Record review revealed that the resident had an order to receive narcotic medication  10 mg (milligrams), four times daily on 9/23/14. During the 11:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M. shift on 9/23/14, the resident was supposed to receive two doses of  10 mg at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. According to the incident report, instead of administering  10 mg to the resident at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M., Nurse #3 mistakenly gave the resident anti anxiety medication 1 mg. Nurse #3 had taken two doses of anti anxiety medication 1 mg belonging to another resident from the narcotic box and administered it to Resident #18 at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00A.M.

Nurse #6’s witness statement dated 9/23/14, indicated that the narcotic count was incorrect when conducting count with Nurse #3 who worked the 11:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.  shift. Nurse #6 said, when Nurse #3 realized what he/she had done wrong, Nurse #3 called  the physician. Nurse #3 told Nurse #6 that he/she had taken a one time order from the Physician to fix the errors. Once the count was correct, Nurse #6 indicated that he/she  took over the medication cart from Nurse #3. Nurse #6 said in his/her witness statement  that the situation was very upsetting and that Nurse #3 did not want to inform Resident  #18 of the medication errors. Nurse #6 said that he/she did not agree with not informing the resident of the medication errors. Nurse #3 eventually went in to inform the resident  of the medication errors he/she had made. Nurse #6 said, he/she assessed, and took the vital signs of Resident #18, who had received the wrong medications.

Nurse #1’s witness statement dated 9/24/14, indicated that he/she observed count being  performed by Nurse #3 (11-7 nurse) and Nurse #6 (7-3 nurse). Nurse #1 said that he/she  could tell something was off with the count. After the count was completed, Nurse #1 noted  in his/her witness statement that narcotic medication was filled out as being given in the narcotic book at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. However, the narcotic medication tablets signed as being administered were not popped out of the medication card and were not administered. Nurse #1 indicated in his/her witness statement that four 0.5 mg tablets were gone from Patient #2’s medication card. Nurse #3 wrote in the narcotic register that the four narcotic medication 0.5 mg tablets were popped in error. Nurse #1 said in his/her statement that Nurse #3 asked him/her to co-sign that the four [MEDICATION NAME] 0.5 mg tablets were popped in error and that he/she was calling the doctor to make him aware. Nurse #1 indicated further that Nurse #3 called the doctor and got an order to give narcotic medication 1 mg at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. Additionally, Nurse #1 indicated that he/she notified the DON (Director of Nursing) that there was no order obtained by the physician to hold the resident’s narcotic medication, even though this was documented by Nurse #3 in his/her nurse’s note, and on the back of the MAR (Medication Administration Record). Nurse #1 indicated that this was confirmed with the DON and the SDC (Staff Development Coordinator).

The SDC’s witness statement dated 9/23/14 was reviewed on 12/3/14. The SDC said that he/she was approached by Nurse #6 about a serious medication error that had been made by Nurse #3. The SDC’s statement indicated that Resident #18 had been given another resident’s narcotic medication 1 mg at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M., and did not receive narcotic medication 10 mg as ordered at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. The SDC indicated that the medication error was discovered by the Nurse #3 and Nurse #6 while doing the change of shift narcotic count at 7:00 A.M. According to the SDC, Nurse #3 circled the  narcotic medication 10 mg doses in the MAR and wrote medication on hold. for 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. The SDC’s statement also indicated that Nurse #3 wrote in the narcotic book that the narcotic medication 1 mg taken from another resident was popped and destroyed and had another nurse cosign this. The SDC further indicated in his/her statement that the narcotic medication was never popped and destroyed because it was given to Resident #18. Also, the narcotic medication that should have been given to the resident was not touched. The SDC followed up with Nurse #6 regarding Resident #18’s condition following receiving the wrong medication twice during the 11:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M. shift. The SDC was informed by Nurse #6 that the resident’s vital signs were within normal limits and the resident appeared lethargic during the 7:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. shift. The SDC’s statement indicated that the incident was reported to the Administrator and Director of Nursing. The Administrator called the facility’s pharmacy following the medication errors.

The SDC was interviewed on 12/4/14 at 4:20 P.M. After reviewing his/her witness statement with the Surveyor, the SDC indicated that it appeared to him/her that Nurse #3 was trying to cover up the errors that Nurse #3 made. The SDC also said that during her interview with the Physician, no order was given by the Physician to Nurse #3 to administered narcotic medication 1 mg at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. as Nurse #3. Record review on 12/3/14, revealed a physician’s telephone order, obtained by Nurse #3 on 9/23/14 at 7:30 A.M., that indicated, Give narcotic medication 1 mg at 12 MN & 6 AM for increased anxiety at 12 AM & 6 AM x 1. The order was transcribed onto the September 2014 MAR and signed off by Nurse #3 as being administered on 9/23/14 at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M. Additionally, Nurse #3 signed off on 9/23/14 at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M., that narcotic medication 10 mg po (by mouth) was held and MD aware. Further record review on 12/3/14, revealed no nursing documentation by Nurse #3 on 9/23/14, to indicate that the resident had experienced any anxiety during the 11:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M. shift. Additionally, Nurse #3 failed to document the reason for holding the  10 mg at 12:00 narcotic medication A.M. and 6:00 A.M.

The Physician’s statement dated 9/24/14, indicated that he/she received a call from a nurse (Nurse #3) at the facility on 9/23/14, who informed him/her that Resident #18 was receiving narcotic medication 5 mg-two tablets every 6 hours PRN for pain, and that the resident had been given narcotic medication 1 mg in error. The Physician indicated that he gave an order to reduce the narcotic medication dose to one tablet (5 mg), not two tablets, and to give narcotic medication 1 mg every 8 hours PRN. The Physician also indicated that this was ordered to prevent side effects secondary to the combination of narcotic medication and narcotic medication given. The Physician’s statement of the orders given to Nurse #3 on 9/23/14 at 7:30 A.M., did not include holding the ordered narcotic medication 10 mg at 12:00 A.M. and 6:00 A.M., nor did it include administering narcotic medication  1 mg at 12:00 and 6:00 A.M. for increased anxiety x 1 as written in the physician’s telephone order by Nurse #3.

The Administrator and Nurse #1 were interviewed on 12/5/14 at 8:30 A.M. regarding the  medication errors made by Nurse #3 and the nurse’s actions following the errors. The Surveyor explained that the actions by Nurse #3 following the medication errors, along with accounts from witnesses to the event, had the appearance of an attempted cover up of the medication errors by Nurse #3. Additionally, when the Administrator and Nurse #1 were asked if Resident #18 had been interviewed about the incident, both said that he/she had not. According to the facility’s policy for Incident Reporting for Medication Errors, Social Services are to be informed in order to support to the resident or family support. The Administrator said that no one from the facility had interviewed Resident #18 regarding the medication errors and Social Services had not interviewed the resident about the incident. The Administrator said that he would have the social worker interview the Resident #18 to get the resident’s account of the incident.

The Social Worker, Nurse #1, and Nurse #6, interviewed Resident #18 on 12/5/14 about the medication errors made by Nurse #3 on 9/23/14. In his/her statement, Resident #18 said that Nurse #3 gave him/her the wrong medication and that he/she didn’t realize it until the next morning when Nurse #3 informed him/her. The resident indicated that the dose of narcotic medication is small and looks similar to another medication in the dark. Resident #18 denied having pain and told the Social Worker that he/she slept the the entire night. Resident #18 also told the Social Worker that she had not been complaining of anxiety and the was her scheduled medication. Resident #18 said to the Social Worker, I was amazed that she could make the same mistake twice in one shift, and I don’t think she’s qualified to be a nurse here or work in the laundry even.

Taunton Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Attorneys

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help.  Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim.  Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases.  If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.  Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case.  If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear.  If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately.  Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case.  Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect.  We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.

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