Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing

Loomis Lakeside

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing? Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.

Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing

Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing is a non-profit, 42-bed Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents of Springfield, Chicopee, West Springfield, East Longmeadow, Ludlow, Agawam, Longmeadow, Wilbraham, Holyoke, South Hadley, Westfield, Palmer, Easthampton, Southwick, and the other towns in and surrounding Hampden County, Massachusetts.

Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing
807 Wilbraham Rd,
Springfield, MA 01109

Phone: (413) 782-1800
Website: https://www.loomiscommunities.org/loomis-lakeside-at-reeds-landing-retirement-living

CMS Star Quality Rating

Loomis LakesideThe Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas.

As of 2018, Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing in Springfield, Massachusetts received a rating of 5 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 5 out of 5 (Much Above Average)
State Health Inspections 5 out of 5 (Much Above Average)
Staffing 5 out of 5 (Much Above Average)
Quality Measures 5 out of 5 (Much Above Average)

Fines Against Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing

The Federal Government has not fined Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing in the last 3 years.

Fines and Penalties

Our Nursing Home Accident Lawyers inspected government records and discovered Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing committed the following offenses:

 

Failed to ensure services provided by the nursing facility meet professional standards of quality.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observations and interviews, the facility staff failed to follow Professional Standards of Practice during medication pass for two residents ( #15 and #17) in a total sample of 12 residents.

Findings include:

Review of the facility Medication Administration General Procedure Policy,undated, indicated that medication cart is to be kept locked at all times unless in use and within nurse’s sight.

1. Resident #15 was admitted to the facility in 10/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. During observation of medication pass on 3/2/18 at 8:00 A.M., Nurse #1 poured the following medications into a medication cup:

-Multi-Vitamin one tablet

-[MEDICATION NAME] Coated Aspirin (ECASA) 81 milligrams (mg) one tablet

-Vitamin B-12 1000 micrograms (mcg) one tablet

-[MEDICATION NAME] (diuretic) 40 mg one tablet

-[MEDICATION NAME] (used to treat high blood pressure) 12.5 mg one tablet

Before entering the Resident’s room to administer medications, Nurse #1 said she needed to check Resident #15 blood pressure. She placed the medication cup on top of medication cart, locked the cart and walked away to look for a blood pressure machine. She walked to the nurse’s station and turned the corner so that she did not have view of the cart. She returned with a portable blood pressure machine, checked Resident #15 blood pressure and administered the medications.

During an interview on 3/2/18 at 8:25 A.M., Nurse #1 said she left the filled medication cup unattended on the medication cart.

2. Resident #17 was admitted to the facility in 12/2107 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of the 3/2018 physician’s orders [REDACTED]. During observation of the medication pass on 3/2/18 at 9:00 A.M., Nurse #1 popped one [MEDICATION NAME] 50 mg tablet from the blister pack into the medication cup. She then popped another [MEDICATION NAME] 50 mg tablet from the blister pack and with her ungloved hands proceeded to break the tablet in half and placed half tablet into medication cup and discarded the other half tablet. She administered the [MEDICATION NAME] medication to the resident.

During an interview on 3/2/18 at 9:20 A.M., Nurse #1 said [MEDICATION NAME] 25 mg tablet blister pack was unavailable in medication cart and she had to break the [MEDICATION NAME] 50 mg tablet to give the correct ordered dose. During an interview on 3/6/18 at 7:52 A.M., Director of Nurses (DON) gave surveyor a manifestation report that indicated Resident #17’s [MEDICATION NAME] 25 mg blister pack was delivered to the facility on [DATE]. She said the blister pack card was in the medication cart but was turned around and Nurse #1 did not see the card during medication pass.

Failed to try different approaches before using a bed rail. If a bed rail is needed, the facility must (1) assess a resident for safety risk; (2) review these risks and benefits with the resident/representative; (3) get informed consent; and (4) Correctly install and maintain the bed rail.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observation, record review and interview the facility staff failed to trial alternatives prior to implementing the use of bed rails for 5 residents (#8, #18, #19, #33, and #89) in a total sample of 12.

Findings include:

Review of the facility Bed Rail Policy, dated 8/31/17, indicated the facility would assess the resident to identify appropriate alternatives prior to installing bed rails. 1. Resident #18 was admitted to the facility in 11/2017 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of a facility Assistive Rail Assessment, dated 11/20/17, indicated the resident used 2 half bed rails and did not include evidence that alternatives were trialed prior to use.

During an observation on 02/27/2018 at 7:30 A.M., the Surveyor observed the resident in bed with the lights dimmed. The right side of the bed was against the wall and the left bed rail was in the upright position.

2. Resident #19 was admitted to the facility in 7/2017 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of a facility Bed Rail Assessment, dated 1/21/18, indicated the resident utilized 2 half bed rails and there was no documented evidence that alternatives were trialed prior to use. Review of 3 previous Assistive Rail Assessments did not indicate that bed rail alternatives were trialed.

During an observation on 2/28/18 at 7:16 A.M., the resident was observed in bed with the right bed rail in the upright position and the left side of the bed against the wall.

3. Resident #89 was admitted to the facility in 2/2018 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of a facility Bed Rail Assessment, dated 2/20/18, indicated the resident used 2 half bed rails and there was no documented evidence that alternatives were trialed prior to use.

During an observation on 2/28/18 at 8:30 A.M., the resident was observed seated at the edge of the mattress having breakfast, with both rails in the upright position. During an interview on 3/2/18 at 1:15 P.M., the Director of Nurses (DON) said she didn’t have evidence of trialing alternatives with Residents #18, #19 and # 89.

4. Resident #8 was readmitted to the facility in 12/2017 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. During an observation on 2/28/18 at 11:22 A.M., found resident in bed with 2 upper bed side rails in up position. Review of the medical record indicated a Bed Rail Assessment, dated 3/4/18, indicated alternatives attempted prior to bed rails were discussed with the Resident but no specific alternatives were listed.

5. Resident #33 was admitted to the facility in 11/2017 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of the medical record indicated a 11/10/17 physician’s orders [REDACTED]. Review of the Bed Rail Assessment, dated 2/18/18, indicated alternatives attempted prior to bed rails were discussed with the Resident Representative with no specific alternatives listed.

During an observation on 2/28/18 at 9:08 A.M., found resident in bed with 2 upper bed side rails in up position. During an observation 3/1/18 at 9:00 A.M., found resident in bed with two upper bed side rails in up position. During an interview on 3/2/18 at 1:10 P.M., the Director of Nurses (DON) said there is no evidence that alternatives were trialed prior to bed rail usage for Residents #8 and #33.

Failed to provide pharmaceutical services to meet the needs of each resident and employ or obtain the services of a licensed pharmacist.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observation and interview, the facility staff failed to ensure that 4 Emergency Medication Kits were of current date to provide reliability of strength and accuracy of dosage on 1 of 1 unit observed.

Findings include:

Review of the facility Medication Storage Policy (undated) indicated that outdated, contaminated, or deteriorated medications and those in containers that are cracked, soiled, or without secure closures are immediately removed from stock, disposed of according to procedure for medication destruction, and reordered from pharmacy, if current order exits.

During an inspection of the Nursing Unit Medication Room with Nurse #1 on [DATE] at 9:42 A.M., the following emergency kits were expired:

-The medication refrigerator contained one [MEDICATION NAME] injectable (used to treat [MEDICAL CONDITION] or to relieve anxiety) with an expiration date of [DATE].

-Large Volume Kit (intravenous supplies) with an expiration date of ,[DATE].

-Drug Kit with an expiration date of ,[DATE].

-Injectable Kit with an expiration date of ,[DATE].

During an interview on [DATE] at 9:45 A.M., Nurse #1 said the [MEDICATION NAME] injectable, Large Volume Kit, Drug Kit and Injectable Kit were all expired.

Failed to safeguard resident-identifiable information and/or maintain medical records on each resident that are in accordance with accepted professional standards.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on record review and interview, the facility staff failed to maintain an accurate record for resuscitation status for 2 residents (#13 and #21) in a total sample of 12 residents.

Findings include:

1. Resident #13 was admitted to the facility in 12/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of a Massachusetts Medical Orders for Sustaining Life (MOLST) document, dated 4/9/17, indicated the resident’s advance directives were Do Not Resuscitate (DNR), and Do Not Intubate and Ventilate (DNI). Review of the Detailed Summary (face sheet) indicated the field entitled Resuscitation was marked yes and was inconsistent with the MOLST.

2. Resident #21 was admitted to the facility in 10/2015 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of a MOLST document, dated 12/16/15, indicated the resident’s advance directives were DNR, and DNI. Review of the Detailed Summary indicated the field entitled Resuscitation was marked yes and was inconsistent with the MOLST. During an interview on 3/6/18 at 7:45 A.M., the Unit Manager reviewed the records for both Resident #13 and #21 and said she doesn’t know why the resuscitation status on the face sheet contradicted the advanced directives on the MOLST. She said they should match.

Failed to provide and implement an infection prevention and control program.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observations, record reviews and interviews, the facility staff failed to follow infection control practices for 1 Resident (#17) during medication administration and for 2 Residents (#13 and #33) on transmission precautions in a total sample of 12 residents.

Findings include:

1. Resident #17 was admitted to the facility in 12/2107 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of the 3/2018 physician’s orders [REDACTED]. During observation of the medication pass on 3/2/18 at 9:00 A.M., Nurse #1 popped one [MEDICATION NAME] 50 mg tablet from the blister pack into the medication cup. She then popped another [MEDICATION NAME] 50 mg tablet from the blister pack and proceeded to break the tablet in half with her ungloved hands and placed half tablet into medication cup and discarded the other half tablet. She administered the [MEDICATION NAME] medication to the Resident. During an interview on 3/2/18 at 9:20 A.M., Nurse #1 said she broke the [MEDICATION NAME] 50 mg tablet in half with her ungloved hands and did not use gloves as she should have.

2. Resident #33 was admitted to the facility in 11/2017 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of the facility Infection Control Manual Policy (YEAR) indicated to apply a mask upon entry into the resident room when a resident is on Droplet Precautions (for residents known or suspected to be infected with pathogens transmitted by respiratory droplets that are generated by a resident who is coughing, sneezing or talking). Review of the medical record indicated Resident #33 tested positive for Influenza A (infectious respiratory infection) on 2/22/18. physician’s orders [REDACTED].

During an observation on 2/28/18 at 10:46 A.M., the Surveyor noted Housekeeper #1 enter Resident #33 room. She did not apply a mask prior to entering the Resident’s room. The Resident was resting in bed. Housekeeper #1 cleaned around the Resident’s bed, bedside table and wiped down the bathroom floor. During an interview on 2/28/18 at 11:00 A.M., the Surveyor asked Housekeeper #1 what the Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) cart outside Resident #33 room indicated. Her response was I don’t know. During an interview on 3/1/18 at 3:28 P.M., the Director of Nurses (DON) said she had just inserviced Housekeeper #1 on (2/28/18 at 8:00 A.M.) about Droplet Precautions procedure and she should have responded appropriately.

3. For Resident #13 the facility staff failed to follow droplet precautions, as ordered. Resident #13 was admitted to the facility in 12/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of a lab report, dated 2/23/18, indicated the resident tested positive for Influenza A. Review of the record indicated a physician’s orders [REDACTED]. During an observation on 2/28/18 at 8:50 A.M., Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) #1 was observed in the resident’s room, conversing with the resident, without a mask in place. The Surveyor observed a sign on the door that indicated the resident was on precautions and observed a container of PPE by the door.

During an interview on 2/28/18 at 8:55 A.M., CNA #1 said the resident was on precautions. When the Surveyor asked CNA #1 if a mask needed to be worn when in the room, she said she only needed to use a mask when bathing the resident, otherwise if she heard the resident cough she would quickly grab a mask and put it on. During an observation on 2/28/18 at 1:19 P.M., the Surveyor observed CNA #1 wearing a mask in the resident’s room to retrieve a lunch tray. She continued to wear the mask out into the hallway (tucked under her chin with straps still behind the ears) and transported another resident to the rosary group.

During an interview on 3/01/18 at 3:38 P.M., the Surveyor reviewed her interview and observations of CNA #1 with the Director of Nurses (DON). The DON said that Resident #13 was on droplet precautions at the time of the observations and further said a mask should have been worn by anyone entering the room and removed before exiting the room.

Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing, Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help. Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim. Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation. Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear. If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately. Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case. Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect. We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.


Sources:

Medicare Nursing Home Profiles and Reports – Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing

Inspection Report for Loomis Lakeside at Reeds Landing – 03/06/2018

Page Last Updated: September 5, 2018