Leonard Florence Center for Living

Leonard Florence Center for Living

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Leonard Florence Center for Living? Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.

Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Leonard Florence Center for Living

Leonard Florence Center for Living is a for non-profit, 110-bed Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents of Revere, Everett, Boston, Winthrop, Malden, Somerville, Cambridge, Medford, Melrose, Saugus, Brookline, Arlington, Lynn, Winchester, Stoneham, and the other towns in and surrounding Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

Leonard Florence Center for Living
165 Captains Row,
Chelsea, MA 02150

Phone: (617) 887-0001

CMS Star Quality Rating

Leonard Florence Center for LivingThe Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas.

As of 2018, Leonard Florence Center for Living in Chelsea, Massachusetts received a rating of 5 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 5 out of 5 (Much Above Average)
State Health Inspections 3 out of 5 (Average)
Staffing 4 out of 5 (Above Average)
Quality Measures 5 out of 5 (Much Above Average)

Fines Against Leonard Florence Center for Living

The Federal Government has not fined Leonard Florence Center for Living in the last 3 years.

Fines and Penalties

Our Nursing Home Accident Lawyers inspected government records and discovered Leonard Florence Center for Living committed the following offenses:

Failed to determine if it is safe for the resident to self-administer drugs.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observation and interview, the facility failed to appropriately assess and monitor resident ability to self-administer medications for 6 residents, (#1, #3, #4, #5, #10, #15) out of a total of 21 sampled residents.

Findings include:

Review of the facility’s Self Administration of Medications Policy, which was undated, indicated the following:

-As part of their overall evaluation, the staff and/or practitioner will assess each resident’s mental and physical abilities to determine whether a resident is capable of self-administering medications

-In addition to general evaluation of decision-making capacity the staff and or practitioner will perform a more specific skill assessment, including (but not limited to the residents ability to read and understand medication labels, comprehension of the purpose and proper dosage and administration time for his or her medications, ability to remove medications from a container and to ingest and swallow, (or otherwise administer them), and ability to recognize risks and major adverse consequences of his or her medications.

Self-administered medications must be stored in a safe and secure place, which is not accessible by other residents. If safe storage is not possible in the resident’s room, the medication of residents permitted to self-administer will be stored on a central medication cart or in the medication room. Review of the facility’s Waiver submitted to and approved by the state agency on 12/6/09, indicated that resident medications will be kept securely locked in the resident rooms and that there will be no medication cart in keeping with the Green House Project mission and philosophy.

1. For Resident #10, the facility failed to assess his/her ability to self administer non-prescription medications at his/her bedside. Resident #10 was admitted to the facility in 2013 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of his/her most recent Minimum Data Set (MDS), dated [DATE], indicated that Resident #10 is alert and oriented and requires assistance with bathing, dressing, transfers and toileting.

During observations of Resident #10’s room on 7/18/17, at 12:54 P.M., the Surveyor observed a package of generic medication [MEDICATION NAME], nasal spray on his/her bedside table and a bottle of Tums on his/her dresser. Resident #10 said that the nurses administer his/her medications. Resident #10 said that he/she used to self administer medications but does not anymore. Resident #10 said that he/she self-administers over the counter medications and he/she purchases them independently. Resident #10 said he/she also takes the [MEDICATION NAME] sporadically due to allergies [REDACTED].>During review of Resident #10’s clinical record, no self-administration assessment could be found and he/she does not have physicians orders for [MEDICATION NAME], nasal spray or Tums. During another observation of Resident #10’s room on 7/19/17, at 9:20 A.M., the Surveyor observed that the nasal spray and the [MEDICATION NAME] pill package were still on his/her bedside table.

During interview with the Director of Nursing (DNS), on 7/19/17, at 11:41 A.M., she said that Resident #10 should not have over the counter medications at bedside and that he/she should not be self-administering medications. 2. For Resident #5, failed to ensure that a resident who was determined as unable to self-administer was not allowed to do so and failed to ensure that Resident #5 adhered to appropriate storage of his/her self-administrated medications.

Resident #5 was admitted to the facility in 2014 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of his/her most recent MDS, dated [DATE], indicated that he/she is alert and oriented and requires supervision with bathing, transfers and toileting.

During observation of Resident #5’s room on 7/18/17, at 11:52 A.M., the Surveyor observed a cup with 6 prescription pills on Resident #5’s bed. The resident was not in the room at the time. During interview with Resident #5 at 12:50 P.M., the surveyor observed that the cup with the 6 prescription pills were still on his/her bed. Resident #5 said that he/she takes his/her own medications and they can be locked in his/her drawer. Review of Resident #5’s clinical record indicated that he/she was last assessed for self-administration of medications on 5/1/2017. The self-administration assessment form indicated that in answer to the question if Resident #5 has the dexterity to handle medications, the answer was no. The form indicated that because the answer to this question was no, that Resident #5 is not a candidate to self-administer medications.

3. For Resident #1, the facility failed to assess his/her ability to self administer prescription and non-prescription medications at his/her bedside. Resident #1 was admitted to the facility in 3/2010 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of his/her most recent Minimum Data Set, (MDS), dated [DATE] indicated that Resident #1 is alert and oriented and is dependent on staff for bathing, dressing, transfers and toileting. Further review indicated Resident #1 has impairments of her/his range of motion to both her/his upper extremities. During an interview on 7/20/17, at 9:00 A.M., Resident #1 said she/he administers her/his own medication. During review of Resident #1’s clinical record, a physician’s orders [REDACTED].#1 may self administer medications. Further review of the clinical record indicated no self-administration assessment could be found.

4. For Resident #15, the facility failed to assess his/her ability to self administer prescription and non-prescription medications at his/her bedside. Resident #15 was admitted to the facility in 3/2010 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of his/her most recent Minimum Data Set, (MDS), dated [DATE] indicated that Resident #15 is alert and oriented and is dependent on staff for bathing, dressing, transfers and toileting. Further review indicated Resident #15 has impairments of her/his range of motion to both her/his upper extremities. During an interview on 7/20/17, at 10:45 A.M., Resident #15 said she/he administers her/his own medication. During review of Resident #15’s clinical record, a physician’s orders [REDACTED].#15 may self administer medications. Review of the clinical record also indicated an incomplete self-administration assessment dated [DATE]. The reverse side of the assessment and consent form is missing. Review of the facility document titled Self-Administration of Medication Assessment and Consent indicated that the form is to be completed on admission and quarterly. No further assessments for self administration of medication could be located in the clinical record.

5. For Resident #3, the facility failed to assess his/her ability to self administer prescription medications at his/her bedside. Resident #3 was admitted to the facility in (YEAR) with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of his/her Quarterly Minimum Data Set, (MDS), dated [DATE], indicated that Resident #3 has moderate impairment in cognition, scoring 11/15 on BIMS (Brief Interview for Mental Status) evaluation and requires supervision with bathing, dressing and grooming. During observations of Resident #3’s room on 7/19/17, at 8:40 A.M. and 12:30 P.M., Surveyor observed three tubes of [MEDICATION NAME] cream (topical steroid to relieve itching). Resident #3 said that the cream goes on both of his/her legs.

During review of Resident #3’s clinical record, no self-administration assessment could be found nor does he/she does have a physicians order for self administration of medications. During an interview with Nurse # 6, on 7/19/17, at 12:30 P.M., she said that the Resident does not self administer medications and the creams should be locked in the drawer. During an interview with the Director of Nursing (DNS), on 7/19/17, at 11:45 A.M., the DNS said that Resident #3 is not capable of self administration of medications and should not have them unsecured in his/her room.

6. For Resident #4, the facility failed to assess his/her ability to self administer prescription medications and failed to ensure that Resident #4 appropriately stored his/her self-administrated medications. Resident #4 was admitted to the facility in (YEAR) with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of his/her Quarterly MDS, dated [DATE], indicated that he/she is alert and oriented and is dependent on staff for bed mobility, transfers, dressing and bathing. During observation of Resident #4’s room on 7/19/17, at 9:00 A.M., the Surveyor observed three empty medication cups on his/her bedside table. During an interview with Resident #4, he/she said that he/she takes his own medications. He/she prepares three cups of medications and leaves them on his/her bedside table to be taken throughout the day. He/she said the medications are supposed to be locked in his/her drawer, but he does not lock it because it is difficult to lock and unlock the drawer.

During an interview with Nurse #6 on 7/19/17, at 12:30 P.M., she said that the medication drawer should be locked, but Resident #4 has a hard time with it so likes to keep it unlocked. Review of Resident #4’s clinical record indicated that he/she was last assessed for self-administration of medications on 2/28/2017. The self-administration assessment form indicated that the resident is alert and oriented times 3. The rest of the assessment is not completed. During an interview with the DNS, on 7/19/17, at 11:45 A.M., the DNS said that Resident #4 needed to have an assessment completed to determine if it was appropriate for him/her to self administer medications.

Failed to provide care for residents in a way that keeps or builds each resident's dignity and respect of individuality.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observation and interview, the facility failed to provide a dignified environment for residents by using foreign languages in resident areas, treating residents with respect during care, and respecting resident room space.

Findings include:

1. Facility staff failed to provide a dignified environment for residents on the Torf and Weiner houses.

Review of the facility’s Use of Foreign Language form, which was undated, indicated the following: Residents have the right to hear their own language spoken to them and around them. When staff talks among themselves in another language, it excludes the resident and can increase confusion and cause insecurity and fearfulness. English is to be spoken at all times in patient care areas. The only exception would be if a resident’s primary language is not English.

During the group interview, facilitated on 7/19/17, all participants reported that staff at times speak in languages other than English on the units and during care. During interviews with facility sampled and non-sampled residents, some reported that staff speak in languages other than English often on the units.

During observations on the Torf Unit on 7/19/17, the following was observed:

-At 1:39 P.M., the surveyor arrived on the unit. Three facility aides were observed speaking loudly and in a language other than English while in the kitchen area. Their conversation was held at a high level of volume so residents in nearby rooms could hear them easily.

-At 1:46 P.M., there were two aides in the area and a conversation in a language other than English was still continuing from the time that the Surveyor arrived on the unit at 1:39 PM. At times, a few words of English were said, but overall the conversation was not in English.

-At 1:59 P.M., the two aides noted above were in a resident’s room providing assistance to the resident and could be heard speaking a few words in a language other than English while giving care.

On 7/19/17, at 2:03 P.M., the Surveyor arrived on the Weiner Unit and 2 aides were speaking in a language other than English in the kitchen area and could be heard by residents in nearby rooms. Upon seeing the Surveyor, their conversation ended.

2. Facility staff failed to care for and answer residents with respect on the Torf and Silfa houses.

On 7/19/17, on the Torf House unit, the following was observed: -At 1:53 P.M., two facility aides were in the kitchen area on the Torf unit. One was seated and completing documentation and another was loading dishes into the dish washer. When a resident’s call light went off, the aide who was seated told the other aide that the resident was calling for him, and he continued to load the dishwasher.

-At 1:55 P.M., the resident called out for help and the aide loading the dishwasher said that he would be right there. He then entered the resident’s room and loudly said, What do you want?, or words to that effect. The aide could then be heard to say, I can’t do that by myself, hold on. or words to that effect, and then called out for the other aide to assist him.

-At 2:00 P.M., the two aides exited the room and began to joke about who would stay on the unit to assist the resident off the toilet. Their conversation was loud enough so the resident would be able to hear.

The resident then called out and the aides returned to the room. One aide called the resident by name and asked loudly, did you poop? or words to that effect, and was heard down the hallway from the resident’s room.

On 7/20/17, at 12:39 P.M., on the Silfa House, the Surveyor observed Resident #10 enter his/her room and press his/her call light. A facility aide entered Resident #10’s room at 12:41 P.M. and the Surveyor heard Resident #10 say that he/she needed assistance to the bathroom. The aide was then observed leaving Resident #10’s room and began to converse with other residents and another staff person. At 12:54 P.M., the Surveyor spoke with Resident #10 and he/she said that when he/she asked for assistance to the bathroom, the facility aide said that he/she was busy and would need to go and ask for help. Resident #10 received assistance to go to the bathroom at 12:57 P.M.; 18 minutes after he/she first called for assistance.

3. Facility staff failed to respect resident room privacy. Review of the facility’s Cell Phone Policy Summary, which was undated, indicated the following: Employee mobile devices shall be turned off or set to silent mode during work hours. Before shift, after shift and on breaks, mobile device usage is limited to the following designated areas: break room, personal vehicle, time clock area at the basement level. On 7/20/17, at 12:36 P.M., the Surveyor entered the Silfa House and observed a facility aide in room [ROOM NUMBER]. The aide was on his/her personal cell phone and was standing and having a personal conversation. The resident was not in the room at this time.

Failed to provide care by qualified persons according to each resident's written plan of care.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observation, interview and record review, the facility failed to provide supervision for meals, per the resident care plan, for 1 resident (#5), out of a total of 21 sampled residents.

Findings include:

Resident #5 was admitted to the facility in 2014 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of his/her most recent Minimum Data Set, ((MDS) dated [DATE], indicated that he/she is alert and oriented and requires supervision with bathing, transfers and toileting. Further review of Resident #5’s most recent comprehensive and quarterly MDS’, dated 10/29/16, and 4/15/17, indicated that he/she requires supervision for eating. Review of Resident #5’s Dietary Quarterly Assessments dated 1/16/17, 4/10/17 and 7/3/17 all indicated that he/she has difficulty with chewing and swallowing and is supervised while eating.

Review of Resident #5’s Nutrition Care plan, revised 7/2/15, indicated that Resident #10 is at risk for alteration in nutrition due to ALS with dysphagia. Interventions include: monitor resident during meals and report for signs/symptoms of choking and/or swallowing difficulty and also indicated supervision with feeding.

Review of Resident #5’s Risk for Aspiration Careplan, revised 12/4/15, indicated that Resident #10 is at risk for entry of GI contents into [MEDICATION NAME] passage due to impaired swallowing and progression of ALS. Interventions include: assess for coughing while eating/drinking, encourage resident to eat meals at table. Review of Resident #5’s Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Care plan, revised 7/2/15, indicated that Resident #5 is unable to perform ADL’s and indicated the following goal: Resident currently supervision with ADLS and feeding (7/12/17). The intervention included: Supervise resident during meals – Supervised Feeding Group (1:8)

During interview with Nurse #1 on 7/18/17, at 12:04 P.M., she said she had been working on Resident #5’s unit for three years. She said that Resident #5 eats his/her meals in his/her room and has never seen him/her eat meals at the dining room table. On 7/18/17, at 12:50 P.M., the surveyor observed Resident #5 eating lunch in his/her room while watching television. Resident #5 was alone in the room and no staff were in the area to supervise him/her or monitor for signs or symptoms of aspiration per his/her care plans.

During follow up interview with Nurse #1 on 7/20/17, at 9:34 A.M., the Surveyor reviewed Resident #5’s care plans and dietician’s notes. Nurse #1 said that she was not aware that Resident #5’s care plans indicated that he/she requires supervision with meals.

Failed to maintain drug records and properly mark/label drugs and other similar products according to accepted professional standards.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on observations and staff interviews, the facility staff failed to ensure that medications and biologicals were of current date to provide reliability of strength and accuracy, on 4 of 5 units observed and failed to ensure medications were stored securely.

Findings include:

1. Resident #13 was admitted to the facility in 2013 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. On 7/20/17 at 3:30 PM, the Surveyor observed that Resident #13 had a personal refrigerator in his/her room. The Surveyor observed the contents of the refrigerator and noted there was a multidose pen of Humalog (insulin) which was open and undated, therefore an expiraion date could not be determined. Also, there was a multidose pen of Novolog (insulin) 70/30 which had expired in 10/2016. In addition, these medications were not securely locked, as per facility policy.

2. During an inspection of the Perlman Unit medication room on 7/18/17, at 3:00 P.M., the following was observed:

A. 1 tube of hemorrhoid cream with an expiration date of 1/2016.

B. 1 box of Algicell Ag wound dressing with an expiration date of 1/2017.

C. 1 packet of non adherent wound dressing with an expiration date of 2/2016.

D. 19 Xeroform wound dressings with expiration dates of 11/2015.

E. 1 Xeroform wound dressing with an expiration date of 3/2016.

F. 31 Xeroform wound dressings with expiration dates of 5/2016.

G. 4 Xeroform wound dressings with expiration dates of 7/2016.

H. 1 Adaptic wound dressing with an expiration date of 10/2016.

I. 5 syringes containing 3 milliliters (ml) each of Heparin flush solution.

J. 1 bottle of Aspirin with an expiration date of 1/2017.

K. 1 bottle of Aspirin with an expiration date of 2/2017.

L. 1 bottle of multivitamin with an expiration date of 3/2017.

During an interview on 7/18/17, at 3:25 P.M., Nurse #2 said we are supposed to be going through these rooms more often than we do. I will give them to my supervisor to destroy, we get so busy. or words to that effect.

3. During an inspection of the McDonald Unit medication room on 7/18/17, at 3:30 P.M. the following was observed:

A. 1 box of 10 Algicell Ag wound dressing with an expiration date of 1/2017.

B. 10 fibracol Plus collagen wound dressings with an expiration date of 11/2015.

C. 5 Ipratropinem Bromide 0.5 milligram (mg) with Albuterol 3 mg nebulizer vials with an expiration date of 11/2016.

D. (1) 250 ml bag of intravenous (IV) sodium chloride solution 0.9% with an expiration date of 8/2016.

E. 1 gastric tube feed bag set with an expiration date of 6/2017.

F. 1 vacutainer blood collection tube with an expiration date of 5/2013.

G. 1 vacutainer blood collection tube with an expiration date of 10/2015.

H. 1 butterfly IV needle set with an expiration date of 2/2013.

I. 3 butterfly IV needle set with an expiration date of 6/2014.

J. 1 butterfly IV needle set with an expiration date of 6/2017.

K. 1 tube of Terbinafine HCL antifungal cream with an expiration date of 5/2017.

L. 24 tabs of 100 mg Metoprolol without a resident’s name or the prescription on the container and with an expiration date of 12/31/16.

During an interview on 7/18/17, at 3:55 P.M., the Nurse #3 said she would dispose of the expired medication.

4. During an inspection of the Silfka Unit medication room on 7/18/17, at 4:01 P.M., the following was observed:

A. 1 bottle of liquid Tylenol with an expiration date of 6/2017.

B. 1 bottle of multivitamin tablets with an expiration date of 3/2017.

C. 2 bottles of Ranitidine with an expiration date of 3/2017.

D. 1 bottle of Calcium tablets with an expiration date of 6/2017.

E. 2 culture and sensitivity transfer straw kits with an expiration date of 5/2016.

F. 1 ESwab collection tube with an expiration date of 7/2015.

G. 13 ESwab collection tubes with an expiration date of 6/2016.

H. 3 ESwab collection tubes with an expiration date of 1/2017. I. 3 ESwab collection tubes with an expiration date of 4/2017.

J. 3 ESwab collection tubes with an expiration date of 5/2017.

K. 2 Culture swabs with an expiration date of 1/2017.

During an interview on 7/18/17, at 4:25 P.M., the Director of Nursing said she would dispose of the expired medication and supplies.

5. During an inspection of the Weiner Unit medication room on 7/18/17, at 4:30 P.M. the following was observed:

A. 1 Xeroform wound dressing with an expiration date of 5/2016.

B. 2 Tegaderm foam wound dressing with an expiration date of 6/2017.

C. 9 Colostomy pouches with an expiration date of 7/2016.

D. 15 Albuterol Sulfate 3 ml single dose vial nebulizer solution with an expiration date of 11/2016.

E. 30 capsules Vancomycin with an expiration date of 11/2016.

F. 1 syringe of 40mg/4 ml Enoxoprin without a prescription.

G. 1 Fibracol Plus wound dressing with an expiration date of 5/2016.

H. 5 Bactiswab collection tubes with an expiration date of 6/10/2016.

I. 3 urinalysis transfer straw kits with an expiration date of 11/2015.

J. 2 culture and sensitivity transfer straw kits with an expiration date of 12/2015.

During an interview, on 7/18/17, at 5:02 P.M., Nurse #4 said there should be no expired medications or supplies in the medication rooms and she would give them to the Director of Nursing to destroy.

6. During medication pass on 7/19/17, at 8:52 A.M., the Surveyor observed a Resident’s treatment drawer to be unlocked and containing 1 bottle of Tums, 1 bottle of Restasis eye drops, 1 bottle of Refresh eye drops, 1 bottle of nasal spray and 1 package of throat lozenges. During an interview on 7/19/17, at 8:52 A.M., Nurse #5 said she could not lock the drawer because the lock was broken and she would tell maintenance to get it fixed. On 7/19/17, at 10:45 A.M., the Surveyor observed the same drawer still unlocked with the same medications still in the drawer. Nurse #5 said she didn’t know what to do because maintenance had not come up to fix it yet.

7. The facility failed to appropriately store and secure medications on the Feldman House. On 7/19/17, at 2:08 P.M., the Surveyor observed a bottle of Kionex Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate 60ML, (a resin medication that helps the body get rid of extra potassium and is used to treat high levels of potassium in the blood). The medication was on the nurses desk with no staff in the area to observe or monitor. Review of the facility’s Storage of Medication Policy, which was undated, indicated the following: The faility shall store all drugs and biologicals in a safe, secure and orderly manner.

Failed to have a program that investigates, controls and keeps infection from spreading.

Based on observation, staff interview and medical record review the facility failed to maintain and follow proper infection control practices for the prevention and spread of infection for 1 Resident during medication pass.

Findings include:

On 7/19/17, at 8:52 A.M., Nurse #5 was observed to prepare a Resident’s medications. Nurse #5 was observed to drop a small white round pill on the top of the Resident’s dresser, contaminating it, next to the medication cup containing the rest of the Resident’s medications to be administered. Nurse #5 picked up the medication cup with her right hand and while doing so was observed to pick up the pill from the dresser between her thumb and forefinger with the same hand. Nurse #5 said she needed to go to the medication room to obtain another medication not available in the Resident’s room. The Surveyor followed Nurse #5 to the medication room and observed Nurse #5 to open a cabinet with her left hand, obtain a bottle of medication with her left hand, place the medication cup on top of the counter and place the contaminated pill, held between her forefinger and thumb, into the medication cup contaminating all the medications in the medication cup. Nurse #5 was then observed to open the bottle obtained from the cabinet and pour one tablet into the medication cup. Nurse #5 then administered the contaminated medications in the medication cup to the Resident.

During an interview on 7/19/17, at 9:00 A.M., Nurse #5 said she agreed that she had placed the contaminated pill into the medication cup and administered the contaminated medications to the Resident. During an interview on 7/19/17, at 9:02 A.M., the Assistant Director of Nursing said That is not acceptable, I will definitely put that on the education list for her. or words to that effect.

Leonard Florence Center for Living, Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help. Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim. Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation. Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear. If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately. Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case. Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect. We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.


Sources:

Medicare Nursing Home Profiles and Reports – Leonard Florence Center for Living

Inspection Report for Leonard Florence Center for Living – 07/21/2017

Page Last Updated: September 4, 2018

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