Hathaway Manor Extended Care Facility

Hathaway Manor Extended Care Facility

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Hathaway Manor Extender Care Facility and Nursing Home? Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases.  If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.  Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case.  If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Hathaway Manor Extended Care Facility

Hathaway Manor Extended Care FacilityThe Hathaway Manor Nursing Home is non-profit Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility with 142 beds. that provides services to the residents New Bedford, Fall River, Dartmouth and all the other cities and towns located in and beyond Plymouth County and Bristol County, Massachusetts. Hathaway Manor Extended Care focuses on short-term rehabilitation, long-term care, hospice care and respite care.

Hathaway Manor Extended Care Facility
863 Hathaway Road
New Bedford, MA 02740
Phone: 508-996-6763

Hathaway Manor Extended Care and Nursing Home Facility – CMS Ratings and Findings

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas. As of 2017, the Hathaway Nursing Home in New Bedford, Massachusetts received a rating of 3 out of 5 stars.

 

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 3 out of 5 (Average)
State Health Inspections 2 out of 5 (Below Average)
Staffing 4 out of 5 (Above Average)
Quality Measures 4 out of 5 (Above Average)

Offenses and Complaints Against Hathaway Manor Extender Care Facility Nursing Home

Government records indicate that Hathaway Manor Extended Care Facility in New Bedford, Massachusetts committed the following offenses:

05/25/2016 The Nursing Home failed to have a program that investigates, controls and keeps infection from spreading.

Based on record review, observation and staff interviews, for 1 (#11) of 24 total sampled Residents, the Facility failed to ensure that infection control measures were followed in the care of a Resident with an open wound.

Findings include:

Resident #11 was admitted to the Facility in 9/2012 .Review of the clinical record indicated Resident #11 had a stage 2 (partial thickness loss involving the epidermis and dermis and presents as an abrasion or shallow crater) coccyx pressure sore.

The most recent Quarterly Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment, dated 2/20/16, indicated that Resident #11 was depressed, and required moderate assistance with transfers, ambulation, and dressing. The MDS indicated that Resident #11 was continent of bowel and bladder. The Surveyor observed Resident #11 in his/her room on 5/20/16. The Surveyor observed that there was a precaution sign outside Resident #10 and Resident #11’s room. Resident #10 (roommate) was admitted to the Facility in 1/2014 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. The most recent MDS quarterly assessment, dated 4/14/16, indicated that Resident #10 was frequently incontinent.

The Surveyor observed two Certified Nurses Aides (CNA #1 & CNA #2) coming out of the precaution room. The Surveyor observed a precaution cart outside the room that did not contain gloves. The Surveyor asked CNA #1 and CNA #2 what precautions they were using for Resident #10 and Resident #11. CNA #1 said she was only a float and had not received report that morning. CNA #2 said she did not receive report that morning but thought that Resident #10 had MRSA in his/her urine. The Surveyor observed that there was no commode in the room and it was unclear what precautions were used by staff. CNA #2 said because both Residents used the bathroom, the toilet was wiped down between each Resident. The Surveyor observed Resident #11’s dressing change on 5/23/16. The Surveyor observed Nurse #1 change the dressing and Nurse #1 noted that Resident #1 had some bloody drainage and the wound appeared larger than the week prior.

The Facility policy for MDRO (multi-drug resistant organisms) was reviewed with the Infection Control Nurse on 5/24/16. The Facility policy indicated that all Residents with MDRO were placed on contact precautions, private rooms were optimal and any Resident with MDRO could be placed with another Resident unless they had risk factors including an open wounds. The Infection Control Nurse said that although Resident #11 had a coccyx wound, the area was closed. The Infection Control Nurse said Resident #10 had MRSA in his/her urine, and both Resident #11 and Resident #10 shared the bathroom. The Infection Control Nurse said that when two Residents share a room and one is infected, the Resident without the infection uses the commode. The Infection Control Nurse said in this case, Resident #11 did not want to use the commode. The Infection Control Nurse said staff were educated on how to clean the toilet between Resident use. Although the Surveyor requested a policy on how to clean the toilets between Resident use, no staff person was able to provide a policy on how to clean the toilet between Residents when one had a MDRO during the survey from 5/19/16 to 5/25/16.

The Director of Nurses (DON) was interviewed several times during the course of the survey from 5/19/16 to 5/25/16. The DON said although he though Resident #11 was offered a room change in light of the MRSA precautions, he could not locate any documentation to indicate a room change was offered to either Resident.

05/25/2016 The Nursing Home failed to make sure services provided by the nursing facility meet professional standards of quality.

Based on record review and staff interviews, the facility failed to provide services in accordance with professional standards for a Resident.

Findings include:

Pursuant to Massachusetts General Law (M.G.L.), chapter 112, individuals are given the designation of Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse which includes the responsibility to provide nursing care. Pursuant to the Code of Massachusetts Regulation (CMR) 244, Rules and Regulations 3.02 and 3.04 define the responsibilities and functions of a Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse respectively. The regulations stipulate that both the Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse bear full responsibility for systematically assessing health status and recording the related health data. They also stipulate that both the Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse incorporate into the plan of care, and implement prescribed medical regimens. The Rules and Regulations 9.03 define Standards of Conduct for Nurses where it is stipulated that a nurse licensed by the Board shall engage in the practice of nursing in accordance with accepted standards of practice. Please refer to the Nursing 2016 Drug Handbook for accepted standards in regards to proper medication administration along with nursing considerations of drug administration issues.

For Resident #16, who had a long and complex cardiac history, the facility staff failed to administer his/her cardiac medications in accordance with physician orders. Review of the medical record indicated the facility staff withheld cardiac medications without parameters to do so, and after the physician ordered parameters, the facility staff withheld cardiac medications according to the wrong parameters.

05/25/2016 The Nursing Home failed to provide housekeeping and maintenance services.

Based on observation and interview, the facility failed to provide adequate housekeeping and maintenance services necessary to maintain a sanitary, orderly, and comfortable
interior throughout the facility on 2 of 3 nursing care units.

Findings include:

On 5/25/16 at 8:50 A.M., during general observations of the facility, the Surveyor observed multiple areas of the facility that were not maintained in a clean and safe manner.  The Unit 1’s shower room was an open area that contained a large shower, two bathrooms, another bathing area and a storage room. The shower room and all the areas (rooms) contained within the shower room were not secured.

Observation in the area (Unit 1’s shower room) of the storage room indicated that the facility staff stored an assortment of items in the room including:

  • The room had Resident equipment, clothing, Christmas decorations, linens and boxes of unknown items. Items were stored in boxes on the floor.
  • A wheelchair was in the room and piled with what was determined to be educational items.
  • There were medication packs that contained M&M candies and other items. However, mixed with the M&M and accessible to anyone entering the room was a box of hypodermic
    needles and an additional supply of needles exposed in the box on the wheelchair. The needles were the size of a pen and the needle was accessible to puncture the skin if
  • In addition, dirty laundry carts (full of soiled linen and covers not closed) were observed in the shower room daily during the survey process. Linen carts (4) full of laundry were also observed in the 2 other Unit’s shower rooms on 5/25/16. The Unit #3’s shower room had missing tile along the wall of the room. The area was approximately 15 inches long and 2 inches long.
05/25/2016 The Nursing Home failed to make sure each resident receives an accurate assessment by a qualified health professional.

Based on record review and staff interview, the facility failed to assure that all sections of the Resident’s Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments accurately reflected the Resident’s status for 3 (#5, #15 and #16) Residents.

Findings include:

Resident #15 was admitted to the facility in 4/2015.  Review of the annual Minimum Data Assessment (MDS) with an assessment reference date of 4/1/16, indicated that Resident #15 scored 15 out of 15 on the Brief Interview of Mental Status (BIMS), indicating he/she was cognitively intact. The Advanced Directives section S of the MDS was coded None of the Above, indicating that Resident #15 was a full code. Review of the medical record indicated the physician had completed a MOLST (Massachusetts orders for Life Sustaining treatment) form with the Resident on 4/3/15 indicating that he/she had requested and the physician signed the orders for a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) and Do Not Intubate (DNI).

During interview on 5/25/16 at 12:50 A.M., the MDS coordinator said that the MDS had been incorrectly coded and would make the correction.

Resident #16 was admitted to the facility in 3/2016 .Review of the admission MDS with an assessment reference date of 3/12/16, indicated that Resident #16 scored a 14 out of 15 on the Brief Interview of Mental Status (BIMS), indicating he/she was cognitively intact. The Advanced Directives section S of the MDS was coded None of the Above, indicating that Resident #16 was a full code.

Review of the medical record indicated the physician had completed a MOLST (Massachusetts orders for Life Sustaining treatment) form with the Resident on 3/8/16 indicating that he/she had requested and the physician signed the orders for a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR), Do Not Intubate (DNI), Do Not Hospitalize (DNH), No feeding tubes, and no intravenous hydration.
During interview on 5/25/16 at 12:50 A.M., the MDS said that the MDS had been incorrectly coded and would make the correction.

Resident #5 was admitted to the facility in 8/2015.  Review of the admission (initial) MDS signed as completed on 5/23/16, did not indicated that the Resident was receiving medical treatment.

The MDS Coordinator was interviewed on 5/25/16 at 11:00 A.M. and acknowledged the omission and said that she would make a correction.

05/25/2016 The Nursing Home failed to make sure that the nursing home area is free from accident hazards and risks and provides supervision to prevent avoidable accidents

Based on observation and interviews, the facility failed to ensure that the facility was free of accident hazards.

Findings include:

On 5/25/16 at 8:50 A.M., during general observations of the facility, the Surveyor observed hypodermic needles in an unlocked storage closet in the Resident shower area on Unit 1.  The Unit 1’s shower room was an open area that contained a large shower, two bathrooms, another bathing area and a storage room. The shower room and all the areas contained within the shower room were not secured. Observation of the storage room indicated that the facility staff stored an assortment of items in the room. The room had resident equipment, clothing, Christmas decorations, linens and boxes of unknown items. A wheelchair was in the room and piled with what was determined to be educational items. There were medication packs that contained M&M candies and other items. However, mixed with the M&M and accessible to anyone entering the room was a box of hypodermic needles and an additional supply of needles exposed in the box on the wheelchair. The needles were the size of a pen and the needle was accessible to puncture the skin if handled.

The Surveyor notified the Unit Manager (#1) at the time of the observation and she said she did not know why the items were being stored in the shower room. She removed the visible hypodermic needles and left the other items in the room. The Surveyor returned to the room later that day at approximately 2:30 P.M. and observed the box on the chair and looking further into the box observed at least one more needle left in the box.

Unit 1, Unit 2 and Unit 3’s oxygen storage rooms were unlocked. The rooms were littered with trash and the floors were dirty. A 4 foot oxygen tank, in Unit 3’s storage room was not secured and had the potential to fall over.

Unit #1’s clean utility room was unlocked, as were the cabinets in the rooms. Items observed in these areas included skin preparation, iodine swabs, hand sanitizer, antibacterial ointment, mouth wash, razors, shower creams and lotions. All were accessible to anyone entering the areas.

Hathaway Manor Extended Care Facility and Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyer

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help.  Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim.  Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases.  If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.  Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case.  If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear.  If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately.  Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers, MI, NH, RI

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case.  Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect.  We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.

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