Countryside Health Care of Milford

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Countryside Health Care of Milford? Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.

Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Countryside Health Care of Milford

Countryside Health Care of Milford is a for government owned, 109-bed Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents of Milford, Hopkinton, Northbridge, Holliston, Medway, Uxbridge, Franklin, Ashland, Blackstone, Grafton, and the other towns in and surrounding Worcester County, Massachusetts.

Countryside Health Care of Milford focuses on 24 hour care, respite care, hospice care and rehabilitation services.

Countryside Health Care of Milford
1 Countryside Dr,
Milford, MA 01757

Phone: (508) 473-0435
Website: http://www.countrysidehc.org/

CMS Star Quality Rating

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas.

As of 2017, Countryside Health Care of Milford in Massachusetts received a rating of 4 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 4 out of 5 (Above Average)
State Health Inspections 3 out of 5 (Average)
Staffing 5 out of 5 (Much Above Average)
Quality Measures 3 out of 5 (Average)

Fines Against Countryside Health Care of Milford

The Federal Government fined Countryside Health Care of Milford $5,072 on Febuary 27th, 2017 for health and safety violations.

Fines and Penalties

Our Nursing Home Injury Attorneys inspected government records and discovered Countryside Health Care of Milford committed the following offenses:

Failed to keep accurate, complete and organized clinical records on each resident that meet professional standards

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on record review and staff interview, the facility failed to ensure that for 2 residents (#11 & #13) of 21 sampled residents, medical records were complete and accurate.

Findings include:

1. Resident #11 had [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. According to the significant change minimum data set (MDS) with a reference date of 8/21/16, this resident was alert and oriented requiring extensive assistance for hygiene, dressing and bathing. This resident had a new right above the knee amputation. This resident’s medical record was reviewed on 11/9/16. According to the physician orders, this resident had finger stick blood glucose checks completed 4 times daily (prior to meals and at bedtime). Humalog insulin was to be administered according to the following parameters prior to meals, but not at bedtime:

*If blood sugar (BS) is 201 – 250, give 2 units Humalog insulin subcutaneously (SC)
*If BS is 251 – 300, give 4 units Humalog insulin SC.
*If BS is 301 – 350, give 6 units of Humalog insulin SC.
*If BS is greater than 350, give 8 units Humalog insulin SC.
*If BS is greater than 400, call Medical Doctor (MD).

Review of the electronic Medication Administration Record [REDACTED]. There was no documentation of the site the sliding scale insulin was administered. There was no record demonstrating site rotation.

In addition, of the 29 instances where sliding scale insulin was administered, there were only 7 where the amount administered was documented. There were 22 instances where there was no documentation of the amount of Humalog administered to the resident. On 11/9/16 at 1:30 P.M., the clinical coordinator was interviewed and confirmed the lack of documentation by staff nurses for both the site rotation and the amount administered to this resident.

2. Resident #13 had [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. This resident was admitted following a left hip repair. This resident’s medical record was reviewed on 11/9/16. According to the physician orders, this resident had finger stick blood glucose checks completed three times daily with meals. Humalog insulin was to be administered according to the following parameters: *If blood sugar (BS) is 200 – 250, give 2 units of Humalog insulin subcutaneously (SC). *If BS is 251 – 300, give 4 units of Humalog insulin SC. *If BS is 301 – 350, give 6 units of Humalog insulin SC. *If BS is 351 – 400, give 8 units of Humalog insulin SC. *If BS is greater than 400, give 10 units of Humalog insulin SC. Review of the electronic Medication Administration Record [REDACTED]. Six of those instances failed to document the site where the insulin was administered. Four of the seven failed to include the amount of Humalog administered.

On 11/10/16 at 9:30 A.M., the clinical coordinator was interviewed by the surveyor. The clinical coordinator conformed the lack of documentation for the amount of insulin administered as well as site rotation.

Failed to make sure services provided by the nursing facility meet professional standards of quality.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on records reviewed and interviews for 1 of 3 sampled residents (Resident #1) the facility failed to ensure acceptable standards of practice were followed on 1/24/17, when an unlicensed staff member applied an instant hot pack incorrectly to Resident #1’s right knee, without a physician’s orders [REDACTED].#1 sustained a second degree burn (red, blistered area) to his/her right upper thigh just above knee.

Findings include:

Pursuant to Massachusetts General Law (M.G.L.), chapter 112, individuals are given the designation of Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse which includes the responsibility to provide nursing care. Pursuant to the Code of Massachusetts Regulation (CMR) 244, Rules and Regulations 3.02 and 3.04 define the responsibilities and functions of a Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse respectively. The regulations stipulate that both the Registered Nurse and Practical Nurse bear full responsibility for systematically assessing health status and recording the related health data.

The Facility Policy, titled Hot Packs, dated 3/10/14, indicated to verify physician’s orders [REDACTED].

Resident #1’s medical history included [DIAGNOSES REDACTED], [MEDICAL CONDITION], muscle weakness, difficulty ambulating, and bilateral lower extremity (BLE) [MEDICAL CONDITION]. Resident #1’s admission physician’s orders [REDACTED]. Resident #1’s Treatment Administration Record (TAR), dated 1/21/17 through 1/31/17, indicated apply Cryotherapy ( treatment that uses a method of localized freezing temperatures to deaden an irritated nerve) four times for 20 minutes as needed for pain and swelling.

An Accident/Incident Report, dated 1/24/17, indicated while assisting Resident #1 out of bed to use the bathroom, Nurse #1 noticed a hot pack strapped to Resident #1’s right knee. The Report indicated Nurse #1 removed the hot pack and observed a reddened area and small pea sized blister approximately one inch above Resident #1’s right knee. The Report indicated Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) #1 applied the hot pack to Resident #1’s right knee with a paper towel as a barrier, and secured it with a Velcro strap. The Report indicated the area was evaluated by the Nurse Practitioner, with an order for [REDACTED]. Review of Resident #1’s medical record indicated there was no documentation to support Resident #1 had a physician’s orders [REDACTED].

The Instant Hot Pack instructions, printed directly on the hot pack indicated, approximate peak temperature is 120 degrees Fahrenheit with a therapeutic time line of 30 minutes, once activated, do not apply against unprotected skin, wrap in soft cloth and apply. The Nurse’s Note, dated 1/24/17, indicated upon assisting Resident #1 out of bed the nurse noticed a hot pack strapped onto Resident #1’s right knee with Velcro strap and the hot pack was wrapped with two paper towels as a barrier. The Note indicated Resident #1’s right knee had an reddened area the size of hot pack with a fluid filled blister the size of a pea, will pass on and continue to monitor. Resident #1’s physician’s orders [REDACTED]. Resident #1’s TAR, dated 1/24/17, indicated apply [MEDICATION NAME] cream topically two times a day to burn on right thigh for three days or until healed. Resident #1’s TAR, dated 1/27/17, indicated apply [MEDICATION NAME] cream topically to burn on right thigh two times a day for two more days.

The Surveyor interviewed Nurse #1 at 7:26 A.M., on 2/28/17. Nurse #1 said she was Resident #1’s primary nurse on the night shift on 1/24/17. Nurse #1 said shortly after midnight she assisted Resident #1 out of bed, observed a hot pack strapped to Resident #1’s right knee, and immediately removed the hot pack to assess Resident #1’s skin. Nurse #1 said Resident #1’s right knee area was reddened the same size as the hot pack, there was a small single fluid filled blister the size of a pea just above Resident #1’s right knee, and that Resident #1 denied discomfort. Nurse #1 said she asked Resident #1 how the hot pack got there, and said Resident #1 told her he/she asked Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) #1 to put a hot pack on his/her knee for discomfort. Nurse #1 said CNA #1 did not ask her if Resident #1 could have a hot pack. Nurse #1 said CNA #1 did not tell her she put a hot pack on Resident #1’s right knee, and said she had no idea how long that hot pack had been in place.

The Surveyor interviewed Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) #1 at 10:44 A.M., on 2/27/17. CNA #1 said on 1/24/17 during the 11:00 P.M., to 7:00 A.M., shift (unable to recall exact time) Resident #1 asked her for a hot pack for his/her right knee discomfort. CNA #1 said she asked a nurse (does not recall name) if Resident #1 could have an hot pack, the nurse said yes, told her where the hot packs were stored, and said the nurse told her she could apply the hot pack to Resident #1’s right knee. CNA #1 said Resident #1 told her she only wanted a paper towel as a barrier, and said Resident #1 told her to use the Velcro strap to keep the hot pack in place so it would not slip off.

The Surveyor interviewed the Staff Development Coordinator (SDC) at 10:32 A.M., on 2/27/17. The SDC said it was Facility practice that CNA’s should not put hot packs on residents. The Surveyor interviewed the Unit Manager at 10:55 A.M., on 2/27/17. The Unit Manager said it was not acceptable practice for a nurse to direct or delegate application of a hot pack on a resident to a CNA. The Surveyor interviewed the Director of Nurse’s (DON) at 8:30 A.M., on 2/27/17 and at various times through out the day. The DON said it was not within CNA #1’s scope of practice to apply Resident #1’s hot pack, and said applying a hot pack to a resident is considered a treatment and would be a nursing responsibility.

Failed to make sure that the nursing home area is free from accident hazards and risks and provides supervision to prevent avoidable accidents

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY** Based on records reviewed and interviews, for one of three sampled residents (Resident #1), the facility failed to ensure on 1/24/17 an instant hot pack applied to Resident #1’s right knee was done correctly and as a result Resident #1 sustained a second degree burn (red, blistered area) to his/her right upper thigh just above knee.

Findings include:

The Facility Policy, titled Hot Packs, dated 3/10/14, indicated to verify physician’s orders [REDACTED]. Resident #1’s medical history included [DIAGNOSES REDACTED], osteoarthritis, muscle weakness, difficulty ambulating, and bilateral lower extremity (BLE) edema. Resident #1’s admission physician’s orders [REDACTED]. Resident #1’s Treatment Administration Record (TAR), dated 1/21/17 through 1/31/17, indicated apply Cryotherapy ( treatment that uses a method of localized freezing temperatures to deaden an irritated nerve) four times for 20 minutes as needed for pain and swelling.

An Accident/incident Report, dated 1/24/17, indicated while assisting Resident #1 out of bed to use the bathroom, Nurse #1 noticed a hot pack strapped to Resident #1’s right knee. The Report indicated Nurse #1 removed the hot pack and observed a reddened area and small pea sized blister approximately one inch above Resident #1’s right knee. The Report indicated Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) #1 applied the hot pack to Resident #1’s right knee with a paper towel as a barrier, and secured it with a Velcro strap. The Report indicated the area was evaluated by the Nurse Practitioner, with an order for [REDACTED]. Review of Resident #1 medical record indicated there was no documentation to indicated Resident #1 had a physician’s orders [REDACTED].

The Instant Hot Pack instructions, printed directly on the hot pack indicated, approximate peak temperature is 120 degrees Fahrenheit with a therapeutic time line of 30 minutes, once activated, do not apply against unprotected skin, wrap in soft cloth and apply. The Nurse’s Note, dated 1/24/17, indicated right knee noted to have reddened area the size of hot pack with fluid filled blister the size of a pea, will pass on and continue to monitor.

Resident #1’s physician’s orders [REDACTED]. The Nurse Practitioner note, dated 1/24/17, indicated Resident #1 asked for a hot pack overnight, hot pack was strapped down to his/her right thigh so it would not shift, and upon removal redness and blistering was noted to right upper thigh. The Nurse’s Note, dated 1/25/17, indicated Silvadene applied to small fluid filled blister on right upper thigh.

The Surveyor interviewed Nurse #1 at 7:26 A.M., on 2/28/17. Nurse #1 said she was Resident #1’s primary nurse on the night shift on 1/24/17. Nurse #1 said shortly after midnight she assisted Resident #1 out of bed, observed a hot pack strapped to Resident #1’s right knee, and immediately removed the hot pack to assess Resident #1’s skin. Nurse #1 said Resident #1’s right knee area was reddened the same size as the hot pack, there was a small single fluid filled blister the size of a pea just above Resident #1’s right knee, and that Resident #1 denied discomfort. Nurse #1 said she asked Resident #1 how the hot pack got there, and said Resident #1 told her he/she asked Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) #1 to put a hot pack on his/her knee for discomfort. Nurse #1 said CNA #1 did not ask her if Resident #1 could have a hot pack. Nurse #1 said CNA #1 did not tell her she put a hot pack on Resident #1’s right knee, and said she had no idea how long that hot pack had been in place.

The Surveyor interviewed Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) #1 at 10:44 A.M., on 2/27/17. CNA #1 said on 1/24/17 during the 11:00 P.M., to 7:00 A.M., shift (unable to recall exact time) Resident #1 asked her for a hot pack for his/her right knee. CNA #1 said she asked a nurse (does not recall name) if Resident #1 could have an hot pack, the nurse said yes, told her where the hot pack were stored, and said the nurse told her she could apply the hot pack to Resident #1’s right knee. CNA #1 said Resident #1 told her she only wanted a paper towel as a barrier, and said Resident #1 told her to use the Velcro strap to keep the hot pack in place so it would not slip off.

Countryside Health Care of Milford, Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help. Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim. Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation. Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear. If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately. Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case. Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect. We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.


Sources:

Medicare Nursing Home Profiles and Reports – Countryside Health Care of Milford

Nursing Home Inspection, Safety and Deficiency Report – Countryside Health Care of Milford 02/27/2017

Complaint Inspections – Countryside Health Care of Milford

Page Last Updated: February 15, 2018

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