Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation Center

Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation Center

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation Center?  Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases.  If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.  Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case.  If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation Center

Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation CenterThe Bedford Gardens Nursing Home is a for profit, 123 bed Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents New Bedford, Fall River, Dartmouth, Westport and the other surrounding towns in Plymouth county and Bristol County, Massachusetts. Bedford Gardens Care Nursing Home focuses on 24 hour care, respite care, hospice care and rehabilitation services.

Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation Center
4586 Acushnet Avenue
New Bedford, MA 02745

Phone: 508-998-1188

CMS Star Quality Rating

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas. As of 2017, the Bedford Gardens Nursing Home in New Bedford, Massachusetts received a rating of 3 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 3 out of 5 (Average)
State Health Inspections 2 out of 5 (Below Average)
Staffing 4 out of 5 (Above Average)
Quality Measures 2 out of 5 (Below Average)

Fines Against Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation Center

The Federal Government fined Bedford Gardens $3,000 in 2014 for health and safety violations. Government records show that the Bedford Gardens Nursing Home in New Bedford, Massachusetts committed the following offenses:

The nursing home failed to immediately tell the resident, the resident's doctor and a family member of the resident of situations (injury/decline/room, etc.) that affect the resident.

Based on records reviewed and interviews the Facility failed to notify the Physician, when on 3/5/16, during routine care to a pressure ulcer on his/her right buttock, staff discovered a new unstageable partial thickness wound to the right buttock area. Resident was transferred to the hospital for evaluation of an unrelated medical condition.

Findings include:

Resident  was admitted to the Facility in February 2016. The Facility’s Policy, titled Changes in status, identifying and communicating, dated April 2015, indicated nursing services will be responsible for communicating a resident’s change in status to the practitioner.

Review of Nursing Daily Skilled Summary Notes, dated 3/5/16, indicated Resident #1 had a new red area on right buttock measuring 1.4 cm. (centimeter).

The Facility was unable to provide documentation to indicate staff notified the Physician of Resident #1’s new reddened area on his/her buttock.

The Surveyor interviewed Nurse #2 at 2:45 P.M., on 9/14/16. Nurse #2 said during routine care she discovered a new reddened area on Resident #1’s right buttock. Nurse #2 said to the best of her recollection, she reported this to another nurse, but was unable to identify who that nurse was. A Treatment Administration Record, dated 3/5/16, and documented as signed by Nurse #2, indicated a new area was discovered on Resident’s right buttock. Nurse #2 said she did not notify the physician of Resident #1’s new skin area. The Surveyor interviewed the Director of Nurses at 3:45 P.M., on 9/9/16. The DON said Nurse #2 should have notified the physician and obtained a physician order.

The Surveyor interviewed Physician #1 at 8:24 P.M., on 9/14/16. Physician #1 said he was not notified Resident #1 had a new skin area noted on 3/5/16 and did not order any treatment. A Nurse’s Progress Note, dated 3/6/16, indicated Resident #1 was transferred to the hospital for an unrelated change in medical condition.

 

The nursing home failed to assess the resident when the resident enters the nursing home, in a timely manner.

Based on record review and staff interview, the facility failed to conduct a comprehensive Minimum Data Set (MDS) admission assessment within 14 calendar days of the Admission reference date for 1 residents (#12) out of a total sample of 17 Residents within 14 calendar days after admission, as required.

Findings include:

Resident #12 was admitted to the facility in 10/2015. Review of Resident #12’s admission Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment with a reference date of 11/14/15, indicated a completion date of 12/8/15 by the Registered Nurse, which was not completed within the required 14 day time frame and was late.

The nursing home failed to completely assess the resident at least every twelve months.

Based on record review and staff interview, the Facility failed to ensure that an Annual Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment was conducted every 12 months, for 3 Residents (#2, #5 and #15 ), of a total sample of 17 Residents.

Findings include:

  • Resident #15 was admitted to the facility in 5/2008. Review of the annual MDS assessment, with an ARD of 10/14/15 and signed as complete on 11/27/15, indicated that the completion date was not within the required 14 day time frame and was late by was 30 days.
  • The surveyor interviewed the MDS nurse on 6/24/16. The MDS nurse said she didn’t start working at the facility until 1/2016. The MDS nurse said prior to her employment at this facility the facility had employed a consultant MDS nurse. No additional information was provided.
  • Resident #2 was admitted to the facility in 1/2015.Review of the Resident #2’s annual Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment with a reference date of 12/23/15, indicated a completion date of 1/12/16 by the Registered Nurse, which was not completed within the required 14 day time frame and was late. During interview on 6/30/16 at 4:30 P.M., the Director of Nurses and Administrator acknowledged that the facility had lapses for timely completion of MDS’s.
Provide enough notice before discharging or transferring a resident.

Based on record review and interview with staff, the facility failed to assure a system was in place to provide a written transfer notice at the time of transfer for 1 (#8) of 2 residents who were transferred to the hospital in a total sample of 17 Residents.

Findings include:

For Resident #8, the facility failed to provide a written transfer notice at the time Resident was transferred to the hospital.

Resident #8 was a long term resident of the facility. The resident had an acute admission to the hospital. Review of the record included a medical transport form which indicated the Resident had a change in medical condition and was transported to the hospital for evaluation and was admitted.

During interview on 6/30/16 at 10:35 A.M., the Social Worker said that she was made aware that there had been a problem with the system of issuing proper notices a few months after starting employment at this facility in 2/2016. According to the Social Worker, the facility’s prior practice included an administrative office staff member prepared the written notice packets to be used by nursing at the time of transfer and/or discharge. According to further interview, and confirmed by Administration, there had been a number of positions vacated by staff in the facility and the administrative staff member who usually prepared the transfer/discharge notice packets no longer worked at the facility. According to the Social Worker, Resident #8 may not have been provided with a proper written notification due to the change in staff at that time.

Review of the nurses’ notes revealed a note dated 5/6/16, that Resident #8 was transferred and admitted to the hospital, however there was no reference that the required written notice of transfer form was completed and provided to the resident/health care agent.

The nursing home failed to provide care for residents in a way that keeps or builds each resident's dignity and respect of individuality.

Based on record review, observation and interviews, the facility failed to promote care in a manner that enhanced dignity and respect for 2 residents (#2 and #5) in a total sample of 17 Residents.

Findings include:

  1. 1. The facility failed to respect Resident #5’s private space and property, by searching a Resident room without permission.
  2. The facility failed to ensure the availability of personal care products to enhance Resident #2’s dignity.
The nursing home failed to make sure that each resident gets a nutritional and well balanced diet, unless it is not possible to do so.

Based on record review and staff interview, the facility failed to ensure that the recommended dietary therapeutic interventions were provided for one for Resident.

The nursing home failed to make sure that the nursing home area is safe, easy to use, clean and comfortable for residents, staff and the public.

Based on observations and staff interview, the facility failed to keep the the facility free of objectionable odors for one of three resident units.

Findings include:

During the survey visit, objectionable odors of urine were evident on the first day of survey 6/23/16 on the first floor resident unit and ongoing until 6/30/16. Refer to the following observations:

  1. On 6/23/16 at 9:40 A.M. a strong urine odor was detected, and noted again at 1:30 P.M
  2. On 6/24/16 at 8:50 A.M. urine odor was evident.
  3. During tour of the first floor at 9:30 A.M. on 6/28/16, there was a strong pervasive odor throughout the entire unit. The odor smelled like urine and was noticeable in the hallways, resident rooms, and dining/activity room.
  4. On 6/29/16 at 8:30 A.M. during the breakfast meal service, odors of urine were evident.
  5. Odors were detected on 6/30/16; the odor remained strong and was pervasive during
    morning hours.

Bedford Gardens Care and Rehabilitation Center, Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help.  Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim.  Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases.  If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.  Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case.  If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear.  If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately.  Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case.  Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect.  We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.

 

Page Last Updated: November 18, 2017

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