Alliance Health at Abbott

MI Elder Abuse Free Legal ConsultationDid someone you love suffer elder abuse or neglect at Alliance Health at Abbott? Our lawyers can help.

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation.

Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

About Alliance Health at Abbott

Alliance Health at Abbott is a for non-profit, 55-bed Medicare/Medicaid certified skilled nursing facility that provides services to the residents of Swampscott, Lynn, Salem,  Peabody, Marblehead, Saugus, Revere, Beverly, Danvers,  Melrose, and the other towns in and surrounding Essex County, Massachusetts.

Alliance Health at Abbott
28 Essex St
Lynn, MA 01902

Phone: (781) 595-5500
Website: http://www.alliancehhs.org/Skilled-Nursing-Rehab-Abbot-House

CMS Star Quality Rating

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) rates all nursing homes that accept medicare or medicaid benefits. CMS created a 5 Star Quality Rating System—1 star is the lowest rating and 5 stars is the highest—that look at three areas.

As of 2017, Alliance Health at Abbott in Lynn, Massachusetts received a rating of 4 out of 5 stars.

Performance Area Rating
Overall Rating 4 out of 5 (Above Average)
State Health Inspections 4 out of 5 (Above Average)
Staffing 3 out of 5 (Average)
Quality Measures 2 out of 5 (Below Average)

 

Fines and Penalties

Our Nursing Home Abuse Attorneys inspected government records and discovered Alliance Health at Abbott committed the following offenses:

Failed to hire only people with no legal history of abusing, neglecting or mistreating residents; or report and investigate any acts or reports of abuse, neglect or mistreatment of residents.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on interview and incident report review the the facility failed to thoroughly investigate a bruise of unknown origin for 1 resident (#2) out of a sample of 20 residents.

Findings include:

Resident #2 was admitted to the facility in 11/2012 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. According to the Quarterly Minimum Data set completed on 1/3/17 resident #3 needs extensive staff assistance for bed mobility and transfers and is totally dependent on staff for bathing, dressing and grooming. Review of an incident/accident report dated 11/27/16 at 2:00 A.M., indicated that during rounds a CNA observed bruised areas on Resident #2 and reported them to the Nurse. There were two bruises on the back of the left arm and and a small area to the right groin. Statements from the nurse and the certified nursing assistant working that shift were attached.

During an interview with the Assistant Director of Nursing on 3/1/17 at 10:15 A.M., she said that when a bruise is identified an investigation should be started. The investigation should include speaking to the staff who cared for the resident in question on the previous shifts. They would go back until the time of origin of the bruise could be determined. If staff and the resident were unable to report how a bruise occur then the resident would be observed in their environment to see if there was a specific resident routine that might be a contributing factor. If the facility was unable to determine a cause of the bruise within 24 hours then a report of injury of unknown origin would be sent to the Department of Public Health.

During an interview with Certified Nursing Assistant #1, he demonstrated how a pad was secured around a resident around the middle of the back. A resident could touch the back of their arm against the pad. There were also straps that would secure the calves of the resident to the sit to stand machine. CNA #1 said there is no pad or anything else that would contact the groin area during transfers with the sit to stand machine. Review of a Nurses Progress note dated 11/27/16 at 8:03 P.M., said there was a question if a bruise was caused by the sit/stand machine, nothing aligned to where the bruises were, patient still unable to recall.

During an interview with the Director of Nurses and the Assistant Director of Nurses on 3/1/17 at 3:45 P.M., they both said they should have gotten statements from staff on the previous shifts. They had focused on the bruises on the arm and were able to identify the pad from the sit to stand machine used for transfers as the origin of the arm bruises. They agreed that a sit to stand machine strap would be around the calf and not the groin. They were unable to say how the bruise on the right groin had occurred.

Failed to provide care by qualified persons according to each resident's written plan of care.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, interview and record review that facility failed to ensure that a plan of care for supervised meals was followed for 1 resident (#7) out of a total sample of 20 residents.

Findings include:

Resident #7 was admitted to the facility in 4/2014 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. Review of the Speech Language Pathologist Evaluation and Plan of treatment indicates a new [DIAGNOSES REDACTED].

Record review indicated that Resident #7 was treated by Speech Therapy from 2/1/17 to 2/10/17 for dysphagia evaluation, PO trials, diet modification, diet analysis, instruction in safe chewing/swallowing strategies to prevent aspiration and caregiver education. Resident #7 was discharged from Speech Therapy on 2/10/17 as he/she had reached the highest practical level and was safely tolerating the least restrictive diet at the time. Discharge recommendations and plan of care included:

-Puree diet, nectar thick liquids -Resident to eat only with supervision
-Limit intake to 1 teaspoon with 2 swallows
-Chin down to left shoulder to swallow
-Check mouth after meal for pocketing food and debris
-Alternate small bites and sips, Use teaspoon for eating. All staff to be informed of the Resident’s special dietary and safety needs

On 2/28/17 from 1:00 P.M. to 1:20 P.M., Resident #7 was observed eating unsupervised in his/her room. Resident #7 did not limit intake to 1 teaspoon with 2 swallows, did not have chin down to left to swallow, and did not alternate small bites and sips. During an interview with Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) 1 on 3/1/17 at 11:15 A.M., he said that Resident #7 is able to eat independently after staff sets up his/her tray by opening containers.

Review of the Care Card for Resident #7 indicated for eating/nutrition:

-mechanical soft, regular liquids (not puree, nectar thick)
-Set up help (not supervised) Review of the Assignment sheet for 2/28/17 and 3/1/17 failed to indicate that Resident #7 needed to be supervised for meals.

During an interview with the Director of Nurses (DNS) on 3/1/17 at 11:55 A.M., she said that Resident #7 should be supervised for meals and that information should have been on the Care Card and Assignment.

Failed to properly care for residents needing special services, including: injections, colostomy, ureostomy, ileostomy, tracheostomy care, tracheal suctioning, respiratory care, foot care, and prostheses

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on record review and policy review the facility failed to ensure that proper care for a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line was provided for 1 of 1 applicable residents (#8) out of a total sample of 20 residents.

Findings include:

Resident #8 was admitted to the facility in 9/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. According to the quarterly Minimum (MDS) data set [DATE] he/she needs extensive assistance with activities of daily living including bed mobility, bathing, dressing and grooming. Review of the medical record on 2/27/17 indicated that a midline catheter was inserted for the administration of normal saline and [MEDICATION NAME] (an antibiotic for urinary tract infection) on 2/26/17 at 6:00 P.M

Review of the facility policy titled midline Catheter Dressing Change, dated 1/15/04 and revised 8/15/08 indicated that for a midline catheter, dressing changes using a transparent dressing are performed 24 hours post insertion. Review of the Medication Administration Record [REDACTED].M., failed to include an order to change the midline catheter dressing for resident #8. During an interview with the Assistant Director of Nurses on 2/28/17 at 4:00 P.M., she said that the facility should have changed the midline catheter dressing on 2/27/17, 24 hours after it was inserted.

Failed to store, cook, and serve food in a safe and clean way

Based on lunch observation from the facility’s portable steam table and staff interview, the Facility failed to ensure that food was handled and served under sanitary conditions. The facility also failed to keep 1 of 1 kitchenettes in sanitary condition.

Findings include:

1. On 3/1/17 at the noon meal observation, the following was observed by Surveyor #3: The portable steam table was set up in the hallway, heated and filled with the containers of food that was to be served for lunch. A cart was wheeled and placed next to the steam table which contained utensils which were to be used for serving. These utensils were placed directly on the top of the cart in liquid that had dripped onto the cart from the utensils. A mound of alcohol swabs were stacked on top of and beside the serving utensils.

Diet Aide #1 was on the other side of the steam table with meal trucks which were to be filled from the steam table and wheeled to the appropriate corridor. The Food Service Supervisor (FSS) was gloved and proceeded to take temperatures of the drinks and food prior to serving. The FSS asked for a glass of cold milk which the gloved Diet Aide #1 removed from the first meal truck. The FSS with gloved hands tore open the alcohol swab and cleaned his thermometer with the swab and then placed it in the glass of milk. Likewise, he did the same with the hot coffee. Once the two drinks were measured and found to be within acceptable range, Diet Aide #1 replaced the covers and did not discard them but returned them to the trays to be served to the residents. The FSS did not comment on this activity. The FSS continued to test all the food with the same gloved hands and throw the used swabs and coverings beside and on top of the service utensils which were still on the cart as mentioned above.

During the meal service, the FSS did not wash hands, kept on the original gloves and the following was observed: The FSS picked up each serving utensil with the original gloves, touching the serving part of the utensil. For each tray, the FSS picked up a roll or piece of bread with the same gloved hands. The FSS picked up sandwiches with the same gloved hands and proceeded to cut them in half with his gloved hand placed over the entire sandwich. The FSS was observed, on occasion, to move the food around on the plate with the same gloved hands in order to make room for the remainder of the food. With the same gloved hands, the FSS picked up each gravy cup with his fingers inside of the cup before filling it.

The Diet Aide proceeded to pick up each plate cover with her fingers inside the cover with the original gloves on. The Diet Aide was observed to swing the 3 trucks around in order to fill the other side, touching the outside of the trucks with the original gloves. She would then wheel them down the appropriate corridor and return to continue with the above. The FSS then proceeded to move all of the equipment to the dining room. He announced that he had to wash hands and change gloves which was the first time that had been done. As the sink in the dining room was not working, the FSS went down stairs to wash hands and returned, touching alarms, door knobs, doors and equipment. He then proceeded to put on clean gloves which was the first time his hands had been washed and gloves were changed. Interview with the Administrative team on 3/2/17 at 2:45 P.M. at the exit, indicated that the Food Service Supervisor should have known better. It was also said that the Dietician will be doing some inservicing regarding infection control practices.

2. During a tour of the kitchenette on 2/27/17 at 7:40 A.M., Surveyor # 1 observed the following:

-2 containers of HI Cal open and undated – Glucerna open and uncovered, open to air
-white bag with unidentified food, unlabeled and undated -white wrapper with unidentified food, unlabeled and undated
-brown paper bag with unidentified food, unlabeled and undated
-2 styrofoam cups with unidentified liquid, unlabeled and undated
-pink and yellow dried food/beverage stains on the bottom of the refrigerator
-gasket broken
-bread fresh thru 2/26/17, expired one day ago

During an interview with the Food Service Director on 2/27/17 at 7:45 A.M., he said all items in the refrigerator should be dated so staff knows when to discard them. He said that Hi Cal expires two days after it is opened and the other items should have been thrown away after 3 days. He discarded the above items. During an interview with the Administrator on 3/1/17 at 4:00 P.M. she said dietary should have taken care of the kitchenettes. Items should have been labeled and thrown away when appropriate. She also said the gasket on the refrigerator had been replaced.

Failed to maintain drug records and properly mark/label drugs and other similar products according to accepted professional standards.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, interview and policy review the facility failed to ensure that expired multi use vials were not available for administration and failed to ensure that medications were properly secured for 1 of 1 nursing medication rooms and for 3 of 3 medication carts.

Findings include:

During observations of the medication room and medication carts on [DATE] at 6:45 A.M., the following was observed:

– two multi use vials of influenza vaccine, open and undated

During an interview with Nurse #1 at 7:00 A.M., he said that multi use vials expire ,[DATE] days after they are opened. Since the vials were not dated an expiration date could not be determined. He removed the vials. On [DATE] at 6:45 A.M., a medication cart was unlocked and unattended outside of Suite A.

On [DATE] at 6:50 A.M., a second medication cart was unlocked and unattended outside room [ROOM NUMBER]. On [DATE] at 6:55 A.M., a third medication cart was unlocked and unattended outside room [ROOM NUMBER]. During an interview with Nurse #1 at 7:00 A.M., he said that the medication carts should be locked when unattended. During an interview with the Assistant Director of Nurses on [DATE] at 11:30 A.M., she said multi use vials should be labeled and discarded according to manufacturers recommendations depending on the medication. She also said the medication carts should be locked when unattended.

Failed to have a program that investigates, controls and keeps infection from spreading.

**NOTE- TERMS IN BRACKETS HAVE BEEN EDITED TO PROTECT CONFIDENTIALITY**

Based on observation, interview, record and policy review the facility failed to ensure that oxygen tubing was changed weekly per facility policy for 2 of 2 applicable residents (#1, #7) and failed to follow infection control guidelines for respiratory equipment for 1 Resident (#1) out of a total sample of 20 resident.

Findings include:

Review of an undated policy titled Oxygen Administration and Storage indicated the following:

-Review physician order [REDACTED].
-Change cannula, humidifier, tubing, and other disposable equipment weekly and as needed. Date, time, and initial tubing when changed.

1. Resident #1 admitted to the facility 8/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. According to the Minimum (MDS) data set [DATE] resident #1 scored a 12 out of 15 on the Brief Interview for Mental Status indicating moderate impairment. Resident #1 needs extensive assistance with activities of daily living including bathing, dressing and grooming. During an interview with Resident #1 on 2/28/17 at 12:40 P.M., he/she said that he/she was just getting over pneumonia and needs to use oxygen sometimes. An oxygen concentrator was observed next to the bed, the nasal cannula was lying uncovered on top of the concentrator. The tubing was unlabeled. Review of the Medication and Treatment Administration Records for Resident #1 failed to include a physician order [REDACTED]. During an interview with the Assistant Director of Nurses on 3/1/17 at 10:45 A.M., she said that Resident #2 began using oxygen 2/23/17. She said there should have been an order for [REDACTED].

2. Resident #7 was admitted to the facility in 4/2016 with [DIAGNOSES REDACTED]. According to the Minimum (MDS) data set [DATE] resident #7 scored a 13 out of 15 on the Brief Interview for Mental Status indicating he/she is cognitively intact. Resident #7 needs extensive assistance for bed mobility and transfers and is dependent on staff for bathing, dressing and grooming. During an interview with Resident #7 on 2/28/17 at 1:00 P.M., he/she said that he/she had been very sick and uses oxygen all the time now. The nasal cannula tubing was observed to be unlabeled.

Review of the Medication and Treatment Records on 2/28/17 indicated that there was an order for [REDACTED]. During an interview with the Assistant Director of Nurses on 3/1/17 at 10:45 A.M., she said that there should have been an order to change the oxygen tubing weekly.

Alliance Health at Abbott, Nursing Home Neglect and Elder Abuse Lawyers

If someone you love has suffered neglect or elder abuse by a senior caregiver, nursing home, or other care facility, our lawyers may be able to help. Regardless of whether or not criminal charges are filed against an alleged abuser, you may still be able to pursue compensation in a civil claim. Compensation in elder abuse cases may be awarded if someone in the care of another suffers harm due to intentional or negligent actions (including failure to take action).

Abuse of the elderly is not acceptable and we fight hard in these types of cases. If you suspect a nursing home or caregiver has caused harm to your loved one in someone elses’ care, contact our law firm today for a free legal consultation. Talking to us does not obligate you to anything, but we may be able to tell you if you have a claim and the value of your case. If we accept your case, you pay no fee unless we recover for you.

Oftentimes, victims of abuse either cannot or will not speak up for themselves out of fear. If you notice any warning signs or symptoms of neglect of abuse an an elderly person, it is important you contact an elder abuse lawyer immediately. Not only are there statute of limitations on filing a claim, but the sooner we start helping you, the easier it will be to collect evidence and talk to any witnesses before important details are lost, hidden, or forgotten.

Boston Personal Injury Lawyers for Elder Abuse Cases

We offer a free, no-obligation legal consultation to help you understand your rights and the value of your case. Our personal injury law firm takes cases involving elder abuse and neglect. We offer legal service to clients in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire.


Sources:

Medicare Nursing Home Profile for Alliance Health at Abbott

Nursing Home Safety, Health and Inspection Report for Alliance Health at Abbott  03/02/2017

Page Last Updated: February 17, 2017

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